musicianer

musicianer

(mjuːˈzɪʃənə)
n
a musician
References in classic literature ?
"I took the imp for a Mingo, as I'm a miserable sinner!" he said; "but when my eye ranged along his ribs for a place to get the bullet in-- would you think it, Uncas--I saw the musicianer's blower; and so, after all, it is the man they call Gamut, whose death can profit no one, and whose life, if this tongue can do anything but sing, may be made serviceable to our own ends.
Macey, in the height of complacency; "our family's been known for musicianers as far back as anybody can tell.
I'm maybe nae jist muckle o' a musicianer, but I can manage French, for instance, rale weel.
Doc Watson is a national treasure, a musicianer of remarkable creativity and soul who drank deeply of our American song in forging a traditional music that was freely unfettered from tradition.
As the 20th century blossomed and railways, then steamboats, then cars began to link previously isolated pockets of the country, a new type of musicianer emerged: the bluesman.
Students and scholars of the early modern South will understand immediately why the figure of the black male vagrant--the rounder, the drifter, the traveling musicianer, the man "bound" for the prison farm or the chain gang--looms large in Wagner's study.
Yet the woman who Roy's mother identifies as "an old maid musicianer" (43) not only liked these pieces but lost control of herself by smiling indiscriminately and bowing to Roy as another human being.
It was a good dance too, good musicianers. They had this fellow playing the piano.