musician

(redirected from musicianly)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

mu·si·cian

 (myo͞o-zĭsh′ən)
n.
One who composes, conducts, or performs music, especially instrumental music.

[Middle English musicien, from Old French, from Latin mūsica, music; see music.]

mu·si′cian·ly adj.
mu·si′cian·ship′ n.

musician

(mjuːˈzɪʃən)
n
(Music, other) a person who plays or composes music, esp as a profession
muˈsicianly adj

mu•si•cian

(myuˈzɪʃ ən)

n.
a person who performs music, esp. professionally.
[1350–1400; Middle English musicien < Middle French. See music, -ian]
mu•si′cian•ly, adj.
mu•si′cian•ship`, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.musician - someone who plays a musical instrument (as a profession)musician - someone who plays a musical instrument (as a profession)
musical group, musical organisation, musical organization - an organization of musicians who perform together
accompanist, accompanyist - a person who provides musical accompaniment (usually on a piano)
accordionist - a musician who plays the accordion
bandsman - a player in a band (especially a military band)
bassist - a musician who play the bass viol
bassoonist - a musician who plays the bassoon
bell ringer - someone who plays musical handbells
carillonneur - a musician who plays a carillon
cellist, violoncellist - someone who plays a violoncello
clarinetist, clarinettist - a musician who plays the clarinet
flautist, flute player, flutist - someone who plays the flute
gambist - a musician who performs upon the viola da gamba
guitar player, guitarist - a musician who plays the guitar
harmoniser, harmonizer - a musician who sings or plays in harmony
harper, harpist - someone who plays the harp
harpsichordist - someone who plays the harpsichord
hornist - a musician who plays a horn (especially a French horn)
jazz musician, jazzman - a musician who plays or composes jazz music
keyboardist - a musician who plays a keyboard instrument
koto player - a musician who plays the koto
lutanist, lutenist, lutist - a musician who plays the lute
oboist - a musician who plays the oboe
organist - a person who plays an organ
percussionist - a musician who plays percussion instruments
performer, performing artist - an entertainer who performs a dramatic or musical work for an audience
pianist, piano player - a person who plays the piano
bagpiper, piper - someone who plays the bagpipe
recorder player - someone who plays the recorder
rhythm and blues musician - a performer (and sometimes composer) of rhythm and blues music
rock 'n' roll musician, rocker - a performer or composer or fan of rock music
saxist, saxophonist - a musician who plays the saxophone
singer, vocalist, vocalizer, vocaliser - a person who sings
sitar player - a musician who plays the sitar
soloist - a musician who performs a solo
trombone player, trombonist - a musician who plays the trombone
cornetist, trumpeter - a musician who plays the trumpet or cornet
vibist, vibraphonist - a musician who plays the vibraphone
fiddler, violinist - a musician who plays the violin
violist - a musician who plays the viola
2.musician - artist who composes or conducts music as a profession
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
adapter, arranger, transcriber - a musician who adapts a composition for particular voices or instruments or for another style of performance
artist, creative person - a person whose creative work shows sensitivity and imagination
cantor, choirmaster, precentor - the musical director of a choir
composer - someone who composes music as a profession
conductor, music director, director - the person who leads a musical group
virtuoso - a musician who is a consummate master of technique and artistry

musician

noun
Quotations
"I am not a musician. I don't go in too deep. If you have the music in your head, and you sing it with your body, then you'll be alright" [Luciano Pavarotti]
"I'm a concert pianist - that's a pretentious way of saying I'm unemployed" [Alan Jay Lerner An American in Paris]

musician

noun
One who plays a musical instrument:
Translations
عازِف موسيقيعَازِفٌ مُوسِيقِيّموسيقي، موسيقار
hudebník-ice-kamuzikant
musiker
muusikko
glazbenik
muzsikuszenész
hljóîfæraleikaritónlistarmaîur
音楽家
음악가
muzikantas
hudobník
glasbenik
musiker
นักดนตรี
nhạc công

musician

[mjuːˈzɪʃən] Nmúsico/a m/f
he's a musicianes músico

musician

[mjuːˈzɪʃən] nmusicien(ne) m/f

musician

nMusiker(in) m(f)

musician

[mjuːˈzɪʃn] nmusicista m/f

music

(ˈmjuːzik) noun
1. the art of arranging and combining sounds able to be produced by the human voice or by instruments. She prefers classical music to popular music; She is studying music; (also adjective) a music lesson.
2. the written form in which such tones etc are set down. The pianist has forgotten to bring her music.
ˈmusical adjective
1. of or producing music. a musical instrument.
2. like music, especially in being pleasant to hear. a musical voice.
3. (of a person) having a talent for music. Their children are all musical.
noun
a film or play that includes a large amount of singing, dancing etc.
ˈmusically adverb
musician (mjuˈziʃən) noun
1. a person who is skilled in music. The conductor of this orchestra is a fine musician.
2. a person who plays a musical instrument. This show has ten singers, twenty dancers and fifty musicians.

musician

عَازِفٌ مُوسِيقِيّ hudebník musiker Musiker μουσικός músico muusikko musicien glazbenik musicista 音楽家 음악가 musicus musiker muzyk músico музыкант musiker นักดนตรี müzisyen nhạc công 音乐家

musician

n músico -ca mf
References in periodicals archive ?
There was a heartwarming amount of both musicianly and sibling empathy between the two, and balances were naturally adjusted as first one instrument, then the other, predominated.
During this rise, he also achieved the rare feat for a British dance artist of breaking America - and not with the kind of high-octane shock-tactic rave beats and audiovisual spectaculars that characterised the EDM explosion, but with subtle, emotional, ambiguous and musicianly work that demands long and deep immersion.
During this rise, he also achieved the rare feat for a British dance artist of breaking America -- and not with the kind of high-octane shock-tactic rave beats and audiovisual spectaculars that characterised the EDM explosion, but with subtle, emotional, ambiguous and musicianly work that demands long and deep immersion.
Which really isn't a complaint at all." He further applauded Bob McMullin's work to bring the disparate musical genres together, saying the arrangements were all "first rate, musicianly and right." (44)
It gave the soloist every chance to show his immaculate technique and musicianly feeling."
Besides having compiled this book with all these utilitarian objects in view, the other aim not neglected was to write it in a dignified musicianly manner, attractive to both the unscholastic as also to the music student That the "HOI POLLOI" will enjoy, and the musical SAVANT take no exceptions to these strains is the ardent wish of THE COMPOSER.
Nonetheless, it is indeed as a composer that Bernstein's musicianly value has been most fiercely debated.
According to Don DeMichael's Down Beat review of My Son the Jazz Drummer, the idea of recording jazz versions of "songs with a Hebraic flavor" was a "good one," especially since the two types of music share a sense of "melancholy." But his apparent praise is backhanded, for he congratulates the musicians for "a tasteful and musicianly job on what could have become repelling in less capable hands." (Even Scott Yanow in his online All Music Guide review displays this ambivalence, claiming that this "historical curiosity is more successful than one might expect." (16))
Sometimes he plays off-mic to let others take the sonic lead, an effective and musicianly gesture.
Among my most vivid memories of Glimmerglass Opera's 2007 production of Handel's Giulio Cesare is Cornelia's entrance aria,"Priva son d'ogni concerto," voiced with velvet tone and musicianly gravitas by the raven-haired, sloe-eyed Lucia Cer-voni.
(23) A critic reviewing a 1900 vocal recital remarked that a composer accompanying his own songs had created "musicianly things all through, but beyond the technical reach of most accompanists.