mustard family


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Related to mustard family: family Brassicaceae

mustard family

n.
A large family of herbs, the Brassicaceae (or Cruciferae), characterized by flowers with four petals arranged in a cross, usually long narrow seedpods, and a pungent odor or taste, and including vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, radishes, and watercress.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mustard family - a large family of plants with four-petaled flowersmustard family - a large family of plants with four-petaled flowers; includes mustards, cabbages, broccoli, turnips, cresses, and their many relatives
dilleniid dicot family - family of more or less advanced dicotyledonous trees and shrubs and herbs
order Papaverales, order Rhoeadales, Papaverales, Rhoeadales - an order of dicotyledonous plants
crucifer, cruciferous plant - any of various plants of the family Cruciferae
cress, cress plant - any of various plants of the family Cruciferae with edible leaves that have a pungent taste
watercress - any of several water-loving cresses
Aethionema, genus Aethionema - Old World genus of the family Cruciferae
Alliaria, genus Alliaria - a genus of herbs of the family Cruciferae; have broad leaves and white flowers and long siliques
genus Alyssum, Alyssum - a genus of the family Cruciferae
Arabidopsis, genus Arabidopsis - a genus of the mustard family having white or yellow or purplish flowers; closely related to genus Arabis
Arabis, genus Arabis - annual to perennial woody herbs of temperate North America, Europe and Asia: rockcress
Armoracia, genus Armoracia - horseradish
Barbarea, genus Barbarea - biennial or perennial herbs of north temperate regions: winter cress
Berteroa, genus Berteroa - hoary alyssum
Biscutella, genus Biscutella - genus of Eurasian herbs and small shrubs: buckler mustard
Brassica, genus Brassica - mustards: cabbages; cauliflowers; turnips; etc.
Cakile, genus Cakile - small genus of succulent annual herbs found on sandy shores of North America and Europe
Camelina, false flax, genus Camelina - annual and biennial herbs of Mediterranean to central Asia
Capsella, genus Capsella - shepherd's purse
Cardamine, genus Cardamine - bittercress, bitter cress
Dentaria, genus Dentaria - usually included in genus Cardamine; in some classifications considered a separate genus
Cheiranthus, genus Cheiranthus - Old World perennial plants grown for their showy flowers
Cochlearia, genus Cochlearia - a genus of the family Cruciferae
Crambe, genus Crambe - annual or perennial herbs with large leaves that resemble the leaves of cabbages
Descurainia, genus Descurainia - includes annual or biennial herbs of America and Europe very similar to and often included among those of genera Sisymbrium or Hugueninia; not recognized in some classification systems
genus Draba - large genus of low tufted herbs of temperate and Arctic regions
Eruca, genus Eruca - annual to perennial herbs of the Mediterranean region
Erysimum, genus Erysimum - large genus of annual or perennial herbs some grown for their flowers and some for their attractive evergreen leaves; Old World and North America
genus Heliophila - genus of South African flowering herbs and subshrubs
genus Hesperis, Hesperis - biennial or perennial erect herbs having nocturnally fragrant flowers
genus Iberis, Iberis - Old World herbs and subshrubs: candytuft
genus Isatis, Isatis - Old World genus of annual to perennial herbs: woad
genus Lepidium, Lepidium - cosmopolitan genus of annual and biennial and perennial herbs: cress
genus Lesquerella, Lesquerella - genus of low-growing hairy herbs: bladderpods
genus Lobularia, Lobularia - sweet alyssum
genus Lunaria, Lunaria - small genus of European herbs: honesty
genus Malcolmia, Malcolmia - genus of plants usually found in coastal habitats; Mediterranean to Afghanistan
genus Matthiola, Matthiola - genus of Old World plants grown as ornamentals
genus Nasturtium, Nasturtium - aquatic herbs
genus Physaria, Physaria - small genus of western North American herbs similar to Lesquerella: bladderpods
genus Pritzelago, Pritzelago - chamois cress
genus Rorippa, Rorippa - annual and perennial herbs of damp habitats; cosmopolitan except Antarctica
genus Schizopetalon - small genus of South American herbs grown for its flowers
genus Sinapis, Sinapis - small genus of Old World herbs usually included in genus Brassica
References in periodicals archive ?
The lander also carried potato and arabidopsis seeds - a plant of the mustard family - as well as fruit fly eggs and yeast.
The insects, plants, potato seeds and arabidopsis a small flowering plant belonging to the mustard family - will be taken to the Moon on board the Chang'e-4 lander and rover in December.
The turnip (Brassica rapa) is a cruciferous root vegetable in the mustard family, along with cauliflower, cabbage, and Brussels sprouts.
Then on a train one day he saw an advert for a steward on an expedition to be led by Dr Cyril Lockhart Cottle, and funded by Sir Jeremiah Colman of the famous mustard family. They were to set sail on a schooner called Malaya.
Camelina, a branch of the mustard family, is indigenous to both Europe and Central Asia and hardly a new crop on the scene: Archaeological evidence indicates that it had been cultivated in Europe for at least three millennia to produce both vegetable oil and animal fodder.
Oil from the seed of this yellow-flowered, herbaceous member of the mustard family can also be made into first-rate cooking oil and high-quality biodiesel, offering a renewable alternative to using imported petroleum for that fuel.
(Chinese or celery cabbage is not; it's in the mustard family.) Cole means "stem," not "cold," as is often the assumption.
Researchers from the John Innes Centre in Norwich discovered the hidden ability after studying Arabidopsis, a small flowering plant in the mustard family.
Even seed production of other genera in the mustard family such as radish and arugula (salad rocket) could be impacted because several are known to hybridize with the brassicas to some extent.
The new findings come from work with the plant Arabidopsis, a small plant in the mustard family that's often used in genetic research.
Brassicas are also members of the mustard family and they have a distinctive tangy, somewhat spicy flavour as a result.