mutterings

mutterings

(ˈmʌtərɪŋz)
pl n
criticisms, complaints, or scepticism about someone's ability to do something
References in classic literature ?
The movements and the mutterings which Anne had heard, had been movements and mutterings in his sleep.
The blackness of darkness reigned, the perfect stillness was interrupted only by occasional mutterings of distant thunder.
Hardly had Boris gone than Sonya, flushed, in tears, and muttering angrily, came in at the other door.
He lay muttering incoherently some little time; then for a time he lay silent, and apparently sinking away toward death.
And when the nigger was gone he got up and walked the floor, backwards and forwards, mumbling and muttering to himself and plowing his hands through his hair.
Wharves, landing-places, dock-gates, waterside stairs, follow each other continuously right up to London Bridge, and the hum of men's work fills the river with a menacing, muttering note as of a breathless, ever-driving gale.
This man no longer condemned Bert, himself muttering vaguely of dynamite, end sabotage, and revolution.
He did not compare the new finger marks unintentionally left by Tom a few minutes before on Roxy's glass with the tracings of the marks left on the knife handle, there being no need for that (for his trained eye), but busied himself with another matter, muttering from time to time, "Idiot that I was
Then I saw my mother wrapped up in 'The Master of Ballantrae' and muttering the music to herself, nodding her head in approval, and taking a stealthy glance at the foot of each page before she began at the top.
Dull, low, rapidly muttering, it was unlike, shockingly unlike, the familiar voice of her aunt.
The sea had gone down, and the wind was steady and kept the sails quiet; so that there was a great stillness in the ship, in which I made sure I heard the sound of muttering voices.
The speaker appeared to throw a boot-jack, or some such article, at the person he addressed, to rouse him from his slumbers: for the noise of a wooden body, falling violently, was heard; and then an indistinct muttering, as of a man between sleep and awake.