mutualism


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mu·tu·al·ism

 (myo͞o′cho͞o-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
An association between two organisms of different species in which each member benefits.

mu′tu·al·ist n.
mu′tu·al·is′tic adj.

mutualism

(ˈmjuːtʃʊəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Biology) another name for symbiosis
ˈmutualist n, adj
ˌmutualˈistic adj

mu•tu•al•ism

(ˈmyu tʃu əˌlɪz əm)

n.
a relationship between two species of organisms in which both benefit from the association.
[1860–65]
mu′tu•al•ist, n.
mu`tu•al•is′tic, adj.

mu·tu·al·ism

(myo͞o′cho͞o-ə-lĭz′əm)
A symbiotic relationship between two organisms of different species in which each member benefits. See Note at symbiosis.

mutualism

the living together of two organisms in a mutually beneficial relationship.
See also: Biology
the principle or practice of mutual dependence as the condition of individual and social welfare. — mutualist, n.
See also: Behavior
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mutualism - the relation between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other
interdependence, interdependency, mutuality - a reciprocal relation between interdependent entities (objects or individuals or groups)
trophobiosis - a symbiotic relation in which one organism protects the other in return for some kind of food product
Translations

mutualism

[ˈmjuːtjʊəˌlɪzm] nsimbiosi f mutualistica
References in classic literature ?
Mills were linked to mills and factories to factories, in a vast mutualism of industry such as no other age, perhaps, has ever known.
The three medical revolutions saw mutualism grow from a minor footnote to a major chapter in Cuban health care.
All three argued that Labour needed to 'evolve a more ethical and emotional language for its politics, reviving its traditions to become once again the party of association and mutualism, rather than of a centralising and controlling state' (Rutherford and Lockey, 2010, 6).
With increased production of honeydew resulting in increased visits by tending ants (Bronstein 1994; Itiokia & Inoue 1996), honeydew is the base on which ant-hemipteran mutualism is built (Wiss 2006; Styrsky & Eubanks 2007; Detrain et al.
Mutual Approaches Mutualism offers much to our inner cities.
If such mutualism does indeed exist, the researchers might be able to exploit it in a strategy that harms moth and mold alike.
Prof Davies said: "It believes an historic opportunity has opened up to help transform Wales' economic fortunes through an alternative approach to economic development, public policy and service provision, one based on mutualism, co-operation and shared ownership, creating an opportunity for better government and a fairer society.
In a nod to the wisdom of Mother Nature, businesses are becoming shrewd to this kind of mutualism.
We're shifting from a model of altruism--giving for the sake of doing good--to a model of mutualism, giving that benefits everyone involved.