mutually


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Related to mutually: mutually beneficial, Mutually exclusive events, mutually agreed, Mutually independent

mu·tu·al

 (myo͞o′cho͞o-əl)
adj.
1.
a. Directed and received by each toward the other; reciprocal: mutual respect.
b. Having the same relationship to each other: "They were cognitive companions, mutual brain-pickers" (Cynthia Ozick).
c. Possessed in common: mutual interests.
2. Of, relating to, or in the form of mutual insurance.
n.
A mutual fund.

[French mutuel, from Old French, from Latin mūtuus, borrowed; see mei- in Indo-European roots.]

mu′tu·al′i·ty (-ăl′ĭ-tē) n.
mu′tu·al·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.mutually - in a mutual or shared manner; "the agreement was mutually satisfactory"; "the goals of the negotiators were not reciprocally exclusive"
Translations
vzájemně
gensidigt
molemminpuolisestivastavuoroisesti
á gagnkvæman hátt; sameiginlega
vzájomne
karşılıklı olarak

mutually

[ˈmjuːtjʊəlɪ] ADV
1. (= reciprocally) → mutuamente
these views are mutually exclusiveestas opiniones se excluyen mutuamente
2. (= for/by both parties involved) we arranged to meet at a mutually convenient timeacordamos vernos a una hora que nos viniera bien a los dos
such a move would be mutually beneficial to the two companiesesta medida resultaría beneficiosa para ambas empresas
we mutually agreed thatdecidimos de mutuo or común acuerdo que ...

mutually

[ˈmjuːtʃʊəli] adv
mutually exclusive → qui s'excluent l'un(e) l'autre
a mutually convenient time → une heure qui convient aux deux parties
A meeting would take place at a mutually convenient time → Une rencontre aurait lieu à une heure qui conviendrait aux deux parties.
a mutually agreed solution → une solution adoptée d'un commun accord

mutually

advbeide; (= reciprocally) distrustgegenseitig; satisfactory, beneficialfür beide Seiten; agreed, rejectedvon beiden Seiten; at a mutually convenient timezu einem für beide Seiten annehmbaren Zeitpunkt; mutually contradictoryeinander widersprechend; a gentleman mutually known to usein Herr, den wir beide kennen; mutually assured destruction (Mil) → beiderseitige Bereitschaft zum nuklearen Gegenschlag

mutually

[ˈmjuːtjʊəlɪ] advreciprocamente

mutual

(ˈmjuːtʃuəl) adjective
1. given etc by each of two or more to the other(s). mutual help; Their dislike was mutual.
2. common to, or shared by, two or more. a mutual friend.
ˈmutually adverb
References in classic literature ?
They mutually exhorted each other to be of use in the event of the chances of war throwing either of the parties into the hands of his enemies.
Planted with their broad ends on the deck, a circle of these slabs laced together, mutually sloped towards each other, and at the apex united in a tufted point, where the loose hairy fibres waved to and fro like a top-knot on some old Pottowotamie Sachem's head.
And then, explained Schliemann, society would break up into independent, self-governing communities of mutually congenial persons; examples of which at present were clubs, churches, and political parties.
At the very same time, they mutually execrate their masters when viewed separately.
Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her temper had hardly allowed her to impose any restraint; and the shadow of authority being now long passed away, they had been living together as friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma doing just what she liked; highly esteeming Miss Taylor's judgment, but directed chiefly by her own.
There was a kind of cold hearted selfishness on both sides, which mutually attracted them; and they sympathised with each other in an insipid propriety of demeanor, and a general want of understanding.
Bessie stooped; we mutually embraced, and I followed her into the house quite comforted.
I cannot, therefore, allow of the departure from this place of an individual whom we mutually respect and esteem, without, my dear Sir, taking this public opportunity of thanking you, on my own behalf, and, I may undertake to add, on that of the whole of the Inhabitants of Port Middlebay, for the gratification of which you are the ministering agent.
Still, however, the necessary intercourse between the lords of the soil, and those oppressed inferior beings by whom that soil was cultivated, occasioned the gradual formation of a dialect, compounded betwixt the French and the Anglo-Saxon, in which they could render themselves mutually intelligible to each other; and from this necessity arose by degrees the structure of our present English language, in which the speech of the victors and the vanquished have been so happily blended together; and which has since been so richly improved by importations from the classical languages, and from those spoken by the southern nations of Europe.
These STRULDBRUGS and I would mutually communicate our observations and memorials, through the course of time; remark the several gradations by which corruption steals into the world, and oppose it in every step, by giving perpetual warning and instruction to mankind; which, added to the strong influence of our own example, would probably prevent that continual degeneracy of human nature so justly complained of in all ages.
Having undertaken for the Glory of God, and Advancement of the Christian Faith, and the Honour of our King and Country, a Voyage to plant the first colony in the Northerne Parts of Virginia; doe, by these Presents, solemnly and mutually in the Presence of God and one of another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civill Body Politick, for our better Ordering and Preservation, and Furtherance of the Ends aforesaid; And by Virtue hereof do enact, constitute, and frame, such just and equall Laws, Ordinances, Acts, Constitutions, and Offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meete and convenient for the Generall Good of the Colonie; unto which we promise all due Submission and Obedience.
The long chains of simple and easy reasonings by means of which geometers are accustomed to reach the conclusions of their most difficult demonstrations, had led me to imagine that all things, to the knowledge of which man is competent, are mutually connected in the same way, and that there is nothing so far removed from us as to be beyond our reach, or so hidden that we cannot discover it, provided only we abstain from accepting the false for the true, and always preserve in our thoughts the order necessary for the deduction of one truth from another.