myal


Also found in: Acronyms.

myal

(ˈmaɪəl)
adj
1. (Biology) of or relating to muscle tissue
2. (Physiology) relating or connected to a myotome

myal

(ˈmaɪəl)
n
(Other Non-Christian Religions) the practice of myalism
adj
(Other Non-Christian Religions) (of a person or object) involved in or associated with myalism
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References in periodicals archive ?
(7.) Yan Y, Skliris GP, Penner C, Chooniedass-Kothari S, Cooper C, Nugent Z, Blanchard A, Watson PH, Myal Y, Murphy LC, Leygue E.
(1) Stewart's argument is shared by Olmos and Paravisini in their introduction to Creole Religions in the Caribbean and Samuel Murrell who opposes the good/bad dichotomy between Obeah and Myal (228).
With this design Lewis produces a politics of oceanic space with dual implications: he displaces to an ocean space the violent potential for revolutionary change that existed within the social diversity of colonial populations; and he reproduces from the slaves' traditional belief systems of obeah and myal the value of the ocean as a space of counterorders and an agency of metaphysical threat.
Beginning in the late 1950s, designers began to use planar and three-dimensional (3D) manikins, based on the pioneering work of Dempster (1955), to assess leg room and control reach (Geoffrey, 1961; Kaptur & Myal, 1961).
ERNA BRODBER is the author of several critically acclaimed works, including Jane and Louisa Will Soon Come Home (New Beacon); Myal (New Beacon), which was the Caribbean and Canadian Regional Winner of the 1989 Commonwealth Writers Prize awards; and Louisiana (U.
and Beyond, by Carolyn Grossman and Suzanne Myal (Fiesta Publishing, Tucson, 1996; $14.95).
A myalist revival in the 1840s followed the same geographical limits of Black Baptist Moses Baker's following,(46) and the 1860s revivalist movement which preceded the Morant Bay uprising of 1865 "partook of the Myal tradition," and so "could also be revolutionary."(47) A wave of pocomania revivalism, a nineteenth century African import, like myalism based on dance, drumming, singing and spirit possession, was closely associated geographically with the areas of rebellion in 1938 in Jamaica, carrying on the link of religious revivalism and rebellion.(48) Although there is no evidence of Black Baptist activity in Limon, myalism clearly had a thriving presence there in the period during and especially after the strike.
In both Brodber's Jane and Louisa Will Soon Come Home, Myal, and in Kincaid's Annie John and Lucy there is an exploration of this erasure/abuse and the potential for retrieval of the colonised Caribbean body.
The purpose of one dance in particular, the Myal medicine dance, was unification, i.e.
Nor, Handler and Bilby assert, was there in the case of Jamaica any opposition between obeah (evil) and myal (good).
Weaver's employment of the traditional false dichotomy between Obeah and Myal as an interpretive lens for African religious practices among the enslaved in St.
Jung confirms this cultural and psychic attachment to the cultural matrix with his theory of the "collective unconscious."(12) Miss Coolie's re/version (a re-writing of the colonial script) to the saris is an attempt at subversion (an alternative script) of what Erna Brodber, in her Myal, calls the "spirit thievery" although an insight into Indian rituals is not given by Senior but has been observed in contemporary (post-colonial) works (in addition to Myal) where the reappropriation of a semiotic of culture (repressed and devalued cultural persistences) as a route to the reclamation of self through a subjective or omniscient narrator has been useful.