myelin


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my·e·lin

 (mī′ə-lĭn) also my·e·line (-lĭn, -lēn′)
n.
A white fatty material, composed chiefly of lipids and lipoproteins, that encloses certain axons and nerve fibers. Also called medulla.

my′e·lin′ic adj.

myelin

(ˈmaɪɪlɪn) or

myeline

n
(Anatomy) a white tissue forming an insulating sheath (myelin sheath) around certain nerve fibres. Damage to the myelin sheath causes neurological disease, as in multiple sclerosis
ˌmyeˈlinic adj

my•e•lin

(ˈmaɪ ə lɪn)

n.
a soft, white, fatty material in the membrane of Schwann cells and certain neuroglial cells of the nervous system: the substance of the myelin sheath.
[1865–70]
my`e•lin′ic, adj.

my·e·lin

(mī′ə-lĭn)
A whitish, fatty substance that forms a sheath around many nerve fibers. Myelin insulates the nerves and permits nerve impulses to travel more rapidly. The white matter of the brain is composed of nerve fibers covered in myelin.

myelin

The fatty white substance forming an insulating sheath around many nerve fibers.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.myelin - a white fatty substance that forms a medullary sheath around the axis cylinder of some nerve fibersmyelin - a white fatty substance that forms a medullary sheath around the axis cylinder of some nerve fibers
medullary sheath, myelin sheath - a layer of myelin encasing (and insulating) the axons of medullated nerve fibers
fat - a soft greasy substance occurring in organic tissue and consisting of a mixture of lipids (mostly triglycerides); "pizza has too much fat"
Translations
myelin

my·e·lin

n. mielina, sustancia de tipo grasoso que cubre las fibras nerviosas.

myelin

n mielina
References in periodicals archive ?
Myelin-related diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, are those where the myelin sheath surrounding nerves is damaged leading to deficient nerve transmission that may affect multiple functions, including sensation, cognition and movement, among others.
Many axons are ensheathed by myelin, which serves as a protective layer while also enabling fast and efficient signal transmission.
Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have discovered that a type of skinrelated stem cell could be used to help regenerate myelin sheaths, a vital part of the nervous system linked to neurodegenerative disorders.
In a second study, a team from the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., reports that in mice and rats, brain cells called astrocytes can control how fast nerve cells transmit signals by regulating the thickness of the myelin sheath that insulates nerve fibers.
In MS, the immune system attacks oligodendrocytes, the cells that create myelin.
CLEVELAND, Ohio, July 25, 2018 -- Convelo Therapeutics, Inc., a company nurtured in a biotech incubator, has launched with a mission to discover and develop a new class of medicines that regenerate the protective myelin coating around nerve cells that is lost in various neurological diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS).
has launched from stealth mode with a mission to discover and develop a new class of medicines that regenerate the protective myelin coating around nerve cells that is lost in a wide array of neurological diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS).
No drugs are currently available to repair myelin, the protective sheath which covers the nerves and becomes damaged with MS.
Myelin alterations in the hippocampus and the PFC were commonly reported in the above-mentioned disorders [14-16].
Much like that bare wire, the nerve fibers in the brain lose their protective coating, called myelin, and become extremely vulnerable.
Myelin acts as a conductor of signals for the neural circuits.
In the paranodal regions, paranodal myelin loops bind to the axolemma and form paranodal axo-glial junctions.