prosthesis

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Related to myoelectric prosthesis: prosthetic device

pros·the·sis

 (prŏs-thē′sĭs)
n. pl. pros·the·ses (-sēz)
1. An artificial device used to replace a missing body part, such as a limb, tooth, eye, or heart valve.
2. Replacement of a missing body part with such a device.
3. Linguistics Prothesis.

[Greek, addition, from prostithenai, prosthe-, to add : pros-, pros- + tithenai, to put; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

prosthesis

(ˈprɒsθɪsɪs; prɒsˈθiːsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-ˌsiːz)
1. (Surgery) surgery
a. the replacement of a missing bodily part with an artificial substitute
b. an artificial part such as a limb, eye, or tooth
2. (Phonetics & Phonology) linguistics another word for prothesis
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek: an addition, from prostithenai to add, from pros- towards + tithenai to place]
prosthetic adj
prosˈthetically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pros•the•sis

(prɒsˈθi sɪs for 1; ˈprɒs θə sɪs for 2 )

n., pl. -ses (-siz for 1; -ˌsiz for 2 )
1. a device, either external or implanted, that substitutes for or supplements a missing or defective part of the body.
[1545–55; < Late Latin < Greek prósthesis a putting to, addition =pros(ti)thé(nai) to put to, add (pros- to, toward + tithénai to put)]
pros•thet′ic (-ˈθɛt ɪk) adj.
pros•thet′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

prosthesis

An artificial attachment to replace a body part, such as a limb or organ.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prosthesis - corrective consisting of a replacement for a part of the bodyprosthesis - corrective consisting of a replacement for a part of the body
corrective, restorative - a device for treating injury or disease
glass eye - prosthesis consisting of an artificial eye made of glass
implant - a prosthesis placed permanently in tissue
obturator - a prosthesis used to close an opening (as to close an opening of the hard palate in cases of cleft palate)
pegleg, wooden leg, peg, leg - a prosthesis that replaces a missing leg
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

prosthesis

[prɒsˈθiːsɪs] N (prostheses (pl)) [prɒsˈθiːsiːz]prótesis f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

prosthesis

[prɒsˈθiːsɪs] n (MEDICINE)prothèse f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

prosthesis

n (spec)Prothese f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

pros·the·sis

n. prótesis, reemplazo de una parte del cuerpo con un sustituto artificial.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

prosthesis

n (pl -ses) prótesis f
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Langari, "On the functional limitation in below elbow amputation men using Mechanical and Myoelectric prosthesis via TAPES questionnaire," Life Science Journal, vol.
Nonpharmacological Pain Management Interventions * Position changes * Visual feedback * Motor imagery * Diversional activities * Mirror-box therapy * Reflexology * Pressure application to stump * Acupuncture * Massage * Percussion * Hypnosis * Myoelectric prosthesis * Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) * Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) * Psychotherapeutic therapy Invasive Modalities * Lumbar sympathetic blocks * Deep brain stimulation (DBS) * Motor cortex stimulation (MCS) * Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) * Invasive neuromodulation Sources: Knotkova et al., 2012; Melville, 2016; Virani et al., 2015.
In order to speed up the clinical implementation of the multifunctional myoelectric prostheses, some disparities between an ideal laboratory setting and practical use of a myoelectric prosthesis, such as the electrode location shift, electrode configuration, muscle contraction variation, muscle fatigue overtime, sampling rate of EMG signals, and the prosthesis weight, were investigated in different research groups worldwide [8, 18-20, 28-32, 38, 39].
[3] Mark Broadbent, "The ProDigits(tm) Myoelectric Prosthesis for Partial Hand Absence", publication by Touch Bionics, Scotland, 2010.
Since mirror therapy seemed effective with phantom pain,15 it was thought that this therapy combined with therapeutic approaches might also work with upper limb ampute.7,11 The proposed training protocol is adequate for educating the patient with upper limb amputation in order to control myoelectric prosthesis.7
In order to recover some functional capabilities, subjects with transradial amputation can either use a kinematic prosthesis, in which the motion of the shoulders controls the opening and closing of a gripper, or rely on a myoelectric prosthesis, in which the amplitude of the electrical signals emitted by the remnant muscles in the residual limb is used to control a prosthetic hand.
[20] evaluated two-channel electrical stimulation feedback in four patients with sensory impairments (recent median nerve repair) and a single user of a myoelectric prosthesis. In all subjects, the performance in force control during a force matching task was better when using electrical stimulation with respect to the condition with no tactile feedback.
The Development of a Virtual Myoelectric Prosthesis Controlled by an EMG Pattern Recognition System Based on Neural Networks.
The nerve-muscle graft procedure controls what's known as a myoelectric prosthesis.
Some professionals believe that children who can benefit from a myoelectric prosthesis should begin wearing this type of artificial limb around their first birthday.