myofibroma


Also found in: Medical.
Translations

my·o·fi·bro·ma

n. miofibroma, tumor compuesto de elementos musculares.
References in periodicals archive ?
Myofibroma is an uncommon, benign neoplasm that exhibits perivascular myoid differentiation.
It is characterized by solitary (myofibroma) or multiple nodules (myofibromatosis), which may present as purple to pink skin lesions, most usually painless except for adjacent nerve compression.
Differential diagnosis in the pediatric population and in this anatomical location can be done with cranial/nodular fasciitis, low-grade fibromyxosarcoma, low-grade myofibroblastic sarcoma, lipofibromatosis, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, myofibroma, leiomyosarcoma, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, and hypertrophic scar [13, 27].
Also included in our differential diagnosis was infantile myofibroma.
Clinically, a myofibroma manifests as a solitary nodule in the dermis which can measure a few millimeters to a few centimeters.
Although it is mainly diagnosed by histological examination of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained tissue sections, microscopic diagnosis may sometimes be difficult because of the fact that spindle cell proliferation shares many similarities with schwannoma, neurofibroma, fibromatosis, and myofibroma. Therefore, special stains that identify collagen may be helpful in distinguishing these lesions.
CD34 and Bcl2 positivity aids in distinguishing the SFTs from benign fibrous histiocytoma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberance, myofibroma, fibroma, inflammatory pseudotumours, mesothelioma and neurogenic tumours.7,8 The benign fibrous histiocytoma is typically negative with CD34 and Bcl2.
Original differential diagnoses included acute apical abscess and subacute osteomyelitis but after a biopsy the differential diagnoses expanded to myofibroma, lipoma, adenoma, adenocarcinoma, lymphoma and sarcoma.
Histopathology revealed the lesion to be a myofibroma (figure 2).
Choristoma of larynx and hypopharynx present with airway obstruction and dysphagia (13).The differential diagnosis of masses in oral cavity include teratoma, glioma, hemangioma, cystic hygroma, heterotopic brain tissue, neuro fibroma, myofibroma, encephalocele.
A week later the microscopic examination of the specimen confirmed a diagnosis of myofibroma. The results were reviewed with the patient and subsequent removal of the lesion scheduled.
They include neurofibromas, rhabdoid tumors, and myofibroma. Neurofibromas and myofibromas produce slowly progressive arm monoparesis that may be associated with shoulder paresthesias.