mysticete


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mys·ti·cete

 (mĭs′tĭ-sēt′)
[New Latin mysticētus, from Greek mustikētos, textual transmission error (found in early modern editions of Aristotle's Historia animalium) of the phrase (ho) mūs to kētos, (the) whale (called) the mouse (Aristotle's designation for an unknown kind of aquatic animal) : mūs, mouse; see mūs- in Indo-European roots + to : neuter nominative and accusative singular definite article ; see to- in Indo-European roots + kētos, sea monster, whale (of unknown origin).]

mys′ti·cete′ adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mysticete

(ˈmɪstɪˌsiːt)
n
(Animals) another name for whalebone whale
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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A spokesman for SMASS said: "Minke whales are the smallest mysticete species in our waters, and are less powerful swimmers, therefore less able to escape, or surface to breathe, once entangled."
Unlike the mysticete cetaceans, the boto and the tucuxi did not present a pattern of parallel tracheal folds, because these two species are considered shallow-diving animals and thus do not need to adapt to larger volume changes necessary to make deep dives (Reidenberg & Laitman).
The lowest-frequency noises (1 -20 Hz) are typically caused by seismic activity (e.g., earthquakes); low-frequency noises (20-1000 Hz) are generally caused by shipping and mysticete whales; medium-frequency noises (1-100 kHz) are generally associated with sea state (e.g., wave action); and high-frequency noises (> 100 kHz) result from thermal action (Wenz, 1962; Urick, 1975; Ross, 2005; Au and Hastings, 2008; Hildebrand, 2009).
During the HICEAS in 2002, 23 cetacean species (18 odontocetes and 5 mysticetes) were encountered, and the abundance of 19 species (18 odontocetes and 1 mysticete) was estimated (Barlow, 2006).
(2009): Caught in the act: trophic interactions between a 4-million-year-old white shark (Carcharodon) and mysticete whale from Peru.
"It was such a shame to have had to cancel Mysticete on the final night because of the weather, but I'm glad we managed to get through with just one cancellation.
Event producer Artichoke has announced that Mysticete, the installation in the River Wear by Catherine Garret, has fallen victim to rising water levels.
45 RESPIRATORY CONSTRAINTS RESTRICT YOUNG MYSTICETE'S ABILITY TO DIVE
"Mitochondrial Phylogenetics and Evolution of Mysticete Whales."
Fossil abyssochrysoids also were associated with Eocene cold seeps, wood-falls, and bones of odontocete whales (Squires, 1995: Kiel and Goedert, 2007), and with Miocene cold seeps and the bones of mysticete whales (Amano and Little, 2005).
The smallest mysticete is the pygmy right whale (Caperea marginata), which measures up to 23 feet.