nacrite


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nacrite

(ˈneɪkraɪt)
n
(Minerals) a clay mineral of the kaolinite group
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References in periodicals archive ?
It is a moderately pure clay that mostly consists of kaolinite and other clay minerals, including anauxite, halloysite, dickite, and nacrite. The demand for kaolin is increasing because of its whiteness and fine particle size, which make it different from other clays, such as fireclay and ball clay.
Previous studies (Calagari and Abedini, 2007) indicated that most common mineral phases in this horizon were diaspore, hematite, kaolinite, nacrite, chlorite, pyrophyllite, quartz, muscovite, rutile, calcite, and magnesio-sidero-riebeckite.
Quartz ([alpha]-Si[O.sub.2]), clay minerals (montmorillonite, nacrite, kaolinite) and iron and manganese oxides were identifiable phases throughout the profile (Table 1).
(1989) argue that the FT-IR spectrum as described above could be an indicative of the existence of dickite and nacrite instead of a disordered kaolinite.
The kaolin group is divided into three polytypes (i.e., nacrite, kaolinite, and dickite) in addition to halloysite, their hydrated analogue [5].
The minor minerals like glauconite, chamosite, chlorite and nacrite could be due to the influx of shallow marine water.
In the FT-IR spectra of the South Africa coal, the absorption bands due to clay minerals (e.g., kaolinite, nacrite, dikite, etc.) can be observed.
Nacrite (the monoclinic polymorph of kaolinite and halloysite) was tentatively identified in vugs by Mark Bandy (1944) as white hexagonal-tabular microcrystals with pearly luster, especially in younger veins.
The minerals of the kaolin group comprises kaolinite, dickite, nacrite, and halloysite with kaolinite being the most common (Murray, 2007).
Other, less common mineral species that have been reported from the Klein Spitzkoppe occurrences include bixbyite, chabazite, columbite, euxenite-(Y), gibbsite, nacrite, opal (hyalite), pyrophyllite, talc, ferberite and zircon.
The generalized succession scheme according to Kaspar (1939) is (from oldest to youngest): older carbonates (siderite, ankerite, dolomite), barite, sulphides, whewellite, nacrite, young carbonates (calcite) and secondary minerals (sulphates).
et al.: 1989, Infrared study of structural OH in kaolinite, dickite, nacrite and poorly crystalline kaolinite at 5 to 600K.