naive realism


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Related to naive realism: Representative realism

naive realism

n
(Philosophy) philosophy the doctrine that in perception of physical objects what is before the mind is the object itself and not a representation of it. Compare representationalism1

naive realism

the theory that the world is perceived exactly as it is. Also called natural realism, commonsense realism. Cf. idealism, realism.
See also: Philosophy
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.naive realism - (philosophy) the philosophical doctrine that physical objects continue to exist when not perceived
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
References in periodicals archive ?
How Naive Realism can Explain Both the Particularity and the Generality of Experience, CRAIG FRENCH and ANIL GOMES
This introduces the notion of naive realism, defined as the tendency to believe that one's own ideas are an objectively truthful representation of the world (Griffin & Ross, 1991).
Of all of our senses, we rely on vision the most, so it is easy to succumb to naive realism and think that a brain scan is an actual picture of a brain.
The "A"-type statements (Standard English) all implicitly or explicitly assume the medieval view that has been called "Aristotelian essentialism" or "naive realism." In other words, they assume a world made up of block-like entities with indwelling "essences" or spooks--"ghosts in the machine." The "B"-type statements (E-Prime) recast these sentences into a form isomorphic to modern science by first abolishing the "is" of Aristotelian essence and then reformulating each observation in terms of signals received and interpreted by a body (or instrument) moving in space-time.
But isn't this a kind of naive realism, expecting art to function in ways it never could--nor should we want it to?
Philosophically, Churchland tends toward reductionism and naive realism. She holds both that reality consists of what (neuro)science tells us is really "out there," for example, the brain and its neural circuitry, and that any layer of reality or causality beyond the brain and its electro-chemical workings are epiphenomenal, that is, illusory as cause.
The three accounts are naive realism, egocentrism, and cognitive-informational processing.
Elaborating this argument, Maxwell (2008) pointed out that critical realists reject "naive realism," which is the common-sense viewpoint that our perceptions of reality directly represent its objective nature, but they also reject radical postmodernist perspectives, which hold that reality does not exist apart from our perceptions and constructions of it.
Furthermore, various metatheoretical perspectives (i.e., philosophical standpoint) have been applied to disability research, for example, external realism (naive realism), antirealism, and critical realism [10].
Constructive realism seems to me as a sophisticated approach as it avoids both naive realism and naive constructivism.
1) It offers a sophisticated view of the social construction of reality that steers between the naive realism found in many varieties of environmental thought and an overly linguistically oriented social constructivism found in others.
Kiddo, who was born in the southern village of Bethanien, is known for his naive realism oil-paintings.