naivety

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na·ive·ty

or na·ïve·ty  (nī-ēv′tē, nä-, nī-ē′vĭ-tē, nä-)
n.
Artlessness or credulity; naiveté.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

naivety

(naɪˈiːvtɪ) ,

naïveté

or

naiveté

n, pl -ties or -tés
1. the state or quality of being naive; ingenuousness; simplicity
2. a naive act or statement
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

na•ive•té

or na•ïve•té or na•ive•te

(nɑ ivˈteɪ, -ˌi vəˈteɪ, -ˈiv teɪ, -ˈi və-)

n.
1. the quality or state of being naive; unaffected simplicity.
2. a naive action, remark, etc.
[1665–75; < French; see naive, -ity]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.naivety - lack of sophistication or worldliness
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
artlessness, ingenuousness, innocence, naturalness - the quality of innocent naivete
credulousness, gullibility - tendency to believe too readily and therefore to be easily deceived
simple mindedness, simpleness, simplicity - a lack of penetration or subtlety; "they took advantage of her simplicity"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

naivety

naïveté
noun gullibility, innocence, simplicity, inexperience, credulity, ingenuousness, artlessness, guilelessness, callowness She does have a certain girlish naivety about her. gullibility
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
References in periodicals archive ?
Boone uses humor, cartoons, questions, suggestions, and solutions through a thoroughly "reader friendly" narrative in addresses such commonly misleading ideas as marriage being a 50/50 proposition between husband and wife, being a married couple means losing individual identity, love is logical, only one of you needs to understand finances, having children will keep the marriage together, dysfunctional husbands and wives should stay together for the sake of their children, and so many more illusions, misunderstandings, naiveties, and fairytales about married life.
After the pretensions and naiveties of most of it, what a relief to come to a straightforward piece of architectural criticism by Charles Jencks.