naloxone

(redirected from naloxone hydrochloride)
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Related to naloxone hydrochloride: Suboxone, naltrexone

nal·ox·one

 (năl′ək-sōn′, nə-lŏk′sōn)
n.
A drug, C19H21NO4, used in its hydrochloride form as an antagonist to opioids such as morphine and in combination with buprenorphine for long-term treatment of opioid addiction.

[n(ormal) + al(lyl) + (hydr)ox(y) + (morphin)one, compound related to morphine.]

naloxone

(nəˈlɒksəʊn)
n
(Biochemistry) a chemical substance that counteracts the effects of opiates by binding to opiate receptors on cells
[C20: from N-al(lylnor)ox(ymorph)one, the chemical name]

nal•ox•one

(nəˈlɒk soʊn, ˈnæl əkˌsoʊn)

n.
an analgesic narcotic antagonist, C19H21NO4, used chiefly to counteract overdose.
[1960–65; by shortening and rearrangement of dihydroxy-, morphinan-, and -one]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.naloxone - a potent narcotic antagonist (trade name Narcan) especially effective with morphine
narcotic antagonist - an antagonist used to counteract the effects of narcotics (especially to counteract the depression of respiration)
Translations

naloxone

n naloxona
References in periodicals archive ?
Naloxone: Naloxone hydrochloride is an antigen to an opioid overdose.
The patent for naloxone hydrochloride metered 4 milligram nasal spray, N208411, offers product exclusivity for NARCAN until 2035.
Narcan contains the medication naloxone hydrochloride, which can stop or reverse the effects of a narcotic (opioid) drug overdose.
The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first nasal spray variant of the opioid-overdose drug naloxone hydrochloride.
Since 1996, an increasing number of programs provide laypersons with training and kits containing the opioid antagonist naloxone hydrochloride (naloxone) to reverse the potentially fatal respiratory depression caused by heroin and other opioids (3).
Called Targiniq ER (extended release), the long-acting oxycodone formulation contains naloxone hydrochloride to block euphoric effects if the tablet is crushed and then snorted or injected, according to the FDA.
Narcan, the brand name for naloxone hydrochloride, essentially throws a good drug after a bad.