name of the game


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name of the game

n. Slang
The essential part or quality necessary for the success of an enterprise or the fulfillment of a goal: "The name of the game was to get the story" (David Fitzpatrick).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

name′ of the game′


n.
Informal.
the essential element, consideration, or ultimate purpose; key: Profit is the name of the game in business.
[1965–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Critique: A dark thriller about pursuing wealth through cold-blooded, criminal cynicism, The Name of the Game is a Kidnapping keeps the reader hooked from first page to last.
Defense was the name of the game for the Blue Eagles as they held the Knights to a disastrous 30 percent shooting, 21-of-70, while they converted on a fairly decent 39 percent clip, 26-of-66.
GERRY GOODALL says stability is the name of the game after taking over at relegation-threatened Drumbo last week.
IKECHI ANYA says going for goals will be the name of the game against Gibraltar on Sunday - but insists patience could be the key to success.
Alongside him was Susan Saint James, who was less known to British audiences but had made her name in America with her first big acting role - the 1966 TV movie, Fame is the Name of the Game. This led to her first TV series, The Name of the Game, which won her an Emmy.
In fact with the FFA markets not showing any positive signs for a possible recovery in the near future pessimism is still the "name of the game" in the dry bulk market.
NOSTALGIA will be the name of the game at Curraheen Park tomorrow when there will be a Red Mills Irish Laurels Reunion.
"If you are a striker, you know what the name of the game is," said Moyes.
As you can imagine, when it comes to 'bums, poos and wees', order is not the name of the game and the (child) narrator wonders what would happen if nappies ran out at the Babies Party at the Palace?
The name of the game isn't common sense; it is liability and the almighty dollar.
Here, tilting and tapping is the name of the game, as your circular dough hero seeks to survive increasingly challenging stages of skeletons, rolling through them or splatting them from above.