namesake


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name·sake

 (nām′sāk′)
n.
One that is named after another.

[From the phrase for the name's sake.]

namesake

(ˈneɪmˌseɪk)
n
1. a person or thing named after another
2. a person or thing with the same name as another
[C17: probably a shortening of the phrase describing people connected for the name's sake]

name•sake

(ˈneɪmˌseɪk)

n.
1. a person named after another.
2. a person having the same name as another.
[1640–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.namesake - a person with the same name as another
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Translations
سَمِي، شَخْص يَحْمِل نَفْس الأسْم
jmenovec
navnefælle
imenjak
névrokon
nafnanafninafni, nafna
menovec
namne

namesake

[ˈneɪmseɪk] Ntocayo/a m/f, homónimo/a m/f

namesake

[ˈneɪmseɪk] nhomonyme mfname tape nmarque f

namesake

[ˈneɪmˌseɪk] nomonimo/a

name

(neim) noun
1. a word by which a person, place or thing is called. My name is Rachel; She knows all the flowers by name.
2. reputation; fame. He has a name for honesty.
verb
1. to give a name to. They named the child Thomas.
2. to speak of or list by name. He could name all the kings of England.
ˈnameless adjective
1. not having a name. a nameless fear.
2. not spoken of by name. The author of the book shall be nameless.
ˈnamely adverb
that is. Only one student passed the exam, namely John.
ˈnameplate noun
a piece of metal, plastic etc with a name on it. You will know his office by the nameplate on the door.
ˈnamesake noun
a person with the same name as oneself.
call (someone) names
to insult (someone) by applying rude names to him.
in the name of
by the authority of. I arrest you in the name of the Queen.
make a name for oneself
to become famous, get a (usually good) reputation etc. He made a name for himself as a concert pianist.
name after , (American) name for
to give (a child or a thing) the name of (another person). Peter was named after his father.
References in classic literature ?
He added further, 'As soon as she knew that you were my namesake she tried to get you destroyed, so that you might not free me from the spell.
And respecting language, I willingly hold communication in that spoken by my respected grandmother, Hilda of Middleham, who died in odour of sanctity, little short, if we may presume to say so, of her glorious namesake, the blessed Saint Hilda of Whitby, God be gracious to her soul!''
At Caddy's request I took the supreme direction of her apartment, trimmed it up, and pushed her, couch and all, into a lighter and more airy and more cheerful corner than she had yet occupied; then, every day, when we were in our neatest array, I used to lay my small small namesake in her arms and sit down to chat or work or read to her.
For, like his namesake, Ben, he too visited Scotland.
"I am not prepared to defend my namesake," he said; "but every man has a right to do what he likes with his own, hasn't he?
'Your namesake,' said Mrs Kenwigs, with a sweet smile.
"It's because she was in love with that fat one in spectacles" (that was how Petya described his namesake, the new Count Bezukhov) "and now she's in love with that singer" (he meant Natasha's Italian singing master), "that's why she's ashamed!"
"Did not my great-granduncle, Peter Goldthwaite, who died seventy years ago, and whose namesake I am, leave treasure enough to build twenty such?"
Cora bestowed an approving smile on the pious efforts of the namesake of the Jewish prince, and Heyward soon turned his steady, stern look from the outlet of the cavern, to fasten it, with a milder character, on the face of David, or to meet the wandering beams which at moments strayed from the humid eyes of Alice.
George turned, and, with one indignant blow, knocked Legree flat upon his face; and, as he stood over him, blazing with wrath and defiance, he would have formed no bad personification of his great namesake triumphing over the dragon.
She advanced with masculine strides to intercept the sleigh; and the Judge, directing the namesake of the Grecian king, who held the lines, to check his horse, the par ties were soon near to each other.
This embodiment of a d'Urberville and a namesake differed even more from what Tess had expected than the house and grounds had differed.