naming


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name

 (nām)
n.
1.
a. A word or words by which an entity is designated and distinguished from others.
b. A word or group of words used to describe or evaluate, often disparagingly: Don't call me names.
2. Representation or repute, as opposed to reality: a democracy in name, a police state in fact.
3.
a. A reputation: has a bad name.
b. A distinguished reputation: made a name for himself as a drummer.
4. An illustrious or outstanding person: joined several famous names for a photograph. See Synonyms at celebrity.
tr.v. named, nam·ing, names
1. To give a name to: named the child after both grandparents.
2. To mention, specify, or cite by name: named the primary colors.
3. To call by an epithet: named them all cowards.
4. To nominate for or appoint to a duty, office, or honor. See Synonyms at appoint.
5. To specify or fix: We need to name the time for our meeting.
adj. Informal
Well-known by a name: a name performer.
Idioms:
in the name of
1. By the authority of: Open up in the name of the law!
2. For the reason of; using as a reason: grisly experiments performed in the name of science.
to (one's) name
Belonging to one: I don't have a hat to my name.

[Middle English, from Old English nama; see nō̆-men- in Indo-European roots.]

nam′a·ble, name′a·ble adj.
nam′er n.

naming

(ˈneɪmɪŋ)
n
the act of giving a name to someone or something
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.naming - the verbal act of namingnaming - the verbal act of naming; "the part he failed was the naming of state capitals"
speech act - the use of language to perform some act
acrophony - naming a letter of the alphabet by using a word whose initial sound is the sound represented by that letter
numeration - naming numbers
denotation, indication - the act of indicating or pointing out by name
specification - naming explicitly
2.naming - the act of putting a person into a non-elective positionnaming - the act of putting a person into a non-elective position; "the appointment had to be approved by the whole committee"
decision, determination, conclusion - the act of making up your mind about something; "the burden of decision was his"; "he drew his conclusions quickly"
nomination - the act of officially naming a candidate; "the Republican nomination for Governor"
co-optation, co-option - the act of appointing summarily (with or without the appointee's consent)
delegacy - the appointment of a delegate
ordinance, ordination - the act of ordaining; the act of conferring (or receiving) holy orders; "the rabbi's family was present for his ordination"
recognition - designation by the chair granting a person the right to speak in a deliberative body; "he was unable to make his motion because he couldn't get recognition by the chairman"
Adj.1.naming - inclined to or serving for the giving of names; "the appellative faculty of children"; "the appellative function of some primitive rites"
denotative, denotive - having the power of explicitly denoting or designating or naming
Translations
Namensgebung
dénomminationnommage

naming

nNamen(s)gebung f
References in classic literature ?
In brief, the man and woman competed with each other to name him most without naming him ever the same.
Later in my life I found that my mother had given me the name of "Booker Taliaferro" soon after I was born, but in some way that part of my name seemed to disappear and for a long while was forgotten, but as soon as I found out about it I revived it, and made my full name "Booker Taliaferro Washington." I think there are not many men in our country who have had the privilege of naming themselves in the way that I have.
2016, Transferred Names and Analogy in Name-Formation.--The Oxford Handbook of Names and Naming, Oxford, 158-166.
"Parents should be aware that naming their child does have consequences," cautioned Dr.
And in Newcastle today a conference will delve into the fascinating history of the who what and why of naming.
Based on the belief that social change is also reflected in name giving, this article examines in what way the global spread of the English language has had an impact on naming practices world-wide.
People won't be specifically naming their children "Superstorm Sandy," of course, but there will reportedly be a surge of names that pay homage to the devestation, subconsciously or on purpose.
When it comes to naming a son Mohammad, parents usually don't have any objection.
If you are naming a cat, you can probably skip this question.
This occurred because the two-character given name usually consists of a generation name that identifies individuals by family, a naming custom that will be described later on.
The art of naming turns out to require an interesting combination of skills.