nanosecond


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nan·o·sec·ond

 (năn′ə-sĕk′ənd)
n. Abbr. ns or nsec
One billionth (10-9) of a second.

nanosecond

(ˈnænəʊˌsɛkənd)
n
(Units) one thousand-millionth of a second. Symbol: ns

nan•o•sec•ond

(ˈnæn əˌsɛk ənd, ˈneɪ nə-)

n.
one billionth of a second. Abbr.: ns, nsec
[1955–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nanosecond - one billionth (10^-9) of a second; one thousandth of a microsecond
time unit, unit of time - a unit for measuring time periods
picosecond - one trillionth (10^-12) of a second; one thousandth of a nanosecond
microsecond - one millionth (10^-6) of a second; one thousandth of a millisecond
Translations

nanosecond

nNanosekunde f
References in periodicals archive ?
Micro- and nanosecond discharges in gas bubbles inside the treated volume of water cause the formation of active microparticles with a high value of oxidative potential, measured in volts.
Avram's experience, piscosecond lasers are generally more effective for tattoo removal than are nanosecond lasers.
Another nonignorable conclusion drawn from this electrode model is intracellular effect of nanosecond pulsed electric fields--almost all the voltage was applied across the interior of the cell.
The company said the PTSS is ideal for national laboratories that need the most accurate timing as well as applications where nanosecond precision timing is critical.
It's a moment from all of our childhoods - a nanosecond of naughtiness to be apologised for and then forgotten.
Driving while using a mobile is done en masse, without a second thought, diving through Metro doors with a nanosecond to spare is the norm, and walking under ladders, and into builders, scaffold on every street corner, a daily occurrence.
THINGS can change in a nanosecond in sport, but Lee Westwood's putting coach, Phil Kenyon, is down there with Mario Balotelli's diplomatic adviser in terms of current job security prospects.
Anyone who met Grace Hopper probably heard her talk about the "nanosecond." Hopper liked to use visual examples when she spoke, and she frequently advised young naval officers and programmers not to waste time--not even a nanosecond.
But a 20-centimeter error would adjust the travel time by less than a nanosecond, far too little to account for the 60-nanosecond difference observed.
But get there a nanosecond late and the greedy gannets have scoffed the lot.
Day by day, session by session, hour by hour, minute by minute, second by second, nanosecond by nanosecond (okay...