nanowatt


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nanowatt

(ˈnænəˌwɒt)
n
(Units) a unit of power equal to one billionth of a watt
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
(5.) Nelson, Rick, "Getting a grip on nanowatt to megawatt measurements," EE-Evaluation Engineering, December 2017.
Mahmoud, "A nanowatt successive approximation ADC with offset correction for implantable sensor applications," in Proceedings of IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems, pp.
For a sensing head, as the input power of the active fiber is approximately 30 mW, and the output power of the passive one is only a few hundred nanowatt, the attenuation of the active fiber is very small.
28/40/44-Pin, high performance, enhanced flash, USB microcontrollers with nanoWatt technology," Data Sheet.
VIC's portfolio companies represent a diversified range of industries and products: Medical diagnostics (Ascendant Dx, CardioWise); medical devices (SFC Fluidics, OsteoVantage, Vixiar Medical); pharmaceuticals (BiologicsMD); environmental (BlueInGreen); food safety (BioDetection Instruments); manu-facturing and materials (NanoMech, TiFiber); nutrition (Nutraceutical Innovations, Sevo Nutraceuticals); computing (NanoWatt Design); life sciences instrumentation and research tools (Minotaur Technologies); and silk technology (Akeso Biomedical).
The microcontroller is part of Microchip's nanoWatt Extreme Low-Power (XLP) technology family of devices and consumes only 20.7 mW and a maximum idle mode power consumption of 4.2 mW when operating at 16 MIPS [31].
The Model P100a is asserted to provide a source of continuous nanoWatt power for 20 years or more in applications such as environmental pressure ti /temperature sensors, intelligence sensors, medical implants, trickle charging lithium batteries, semipassive and active RFID tags, silicon clocks, SRAM memory backup, deep-sea oil well electronics, and lower power processors (e.g.