napped


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nap 1

 (năp)
n.
A brief sleep, often during the day.
intr.v. napped, nap·ping, naps
1. To sleep for a brief period, often during the day; doze.
2. To be unaware of imminent danger or trouble; be off guard: The civil unrest caught the police napping.

[Middle English, from nappen, to doze, from Old English hnappian.]

nap′per n.

nap 2

 (năp)
n.
A soft or fuzzy surface on fabric or leather.
tr.v. napped, nap·ping, naps
To form or raise a soft or fuzzy surface on (fabric or leather).

[Alteration (perhaps influenced by obsolete French nape, tablecloth) of Middle English noppe, from Middle Dutch.]

nap 3

 (năp)
tr.v. napped, nap·ping, naps
To pour or put a sauce or gravy over (a cooked dish) in a thin, even layer: "a stuffed veal chop napped with an elegant Port sauce" (Jay Jacobs).

[French napper, from nappe, cover; see nappe.]

nap 4

 (năp)
n.
1.
a. A trick-taking card game in which each player is dealt five cards and bids the number of tricks he or she intends to take, with the highest bidder deciding the trump.
b. The first bid of five tricks in this game, the maximum number in a hand. Also called napoleon.
2. See napoleon1.

[Short for napoleon.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.napped - (of fabrics) having soft nap produced by brushing; "a dress of brushed cotton"; "a fleecy lining"; "napped fabrics"
soft - yielding readily to pressure or weight
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Those who napped for a moderate amount of time after lunch - most of them for close to 60 minutes - showed "better overall cognition" as compared to both people who didn't nap and people who napped for periods that were longer than 90 minutes or shorter than 30 minutes.
A study involving nearly 3,000 older adults recorded participants' night-time sleep habits, and noted whether they took an afternoon nap and, if so, how long they napped. The scientists then looked at the performance of the study participants on a series of mental status tests that assessed attention, and memory, and involved completing basic math problems, answering simple questions, and drawing simple shapes.
Those who napped at least three times per week reduced their risk by 37 percent.