narcolepsy

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nar·co·lep·sy

 (när′kə-lĕp′sē)
n. pl. nar·co·lep·sies
A disorder characterized by sudden and uncontrollable, though often brief, attacks of deep sleep, sometimes accompanied by paralysis and hallucinations.

nar′co·lep′tic (-lĕp′tĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

narcolepsy

(ˈnɑːkəˌlɛpsɪ)
n
(Medicine) pathol a rare condition characterized by sudden and uncontrollable episodes of deep sleep
ˌnarcoˈleptic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

nar•co•lep•sy

(ˈnɑr kəˌlɛp si)

n.
a disorder characterized by frequent and uncontrollable attacks of deep sleep.
[1875–80; narco- + (epi) lepsy]
nar`co•lep′tic, adj., n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

narcolepsy

Pathology. a condition characterized by frequent and uncontrollable lapses into deep sleep. — narcoleptic, adj. — narcolept, n.
See also: Sleep
a condition characterized by an uncontrollable desire for sleep or sudden onsets of sleep. — narcoleptic, adj.
See also: Disease and Illness
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.narcolepsy - a sleep disorder characterized by sudden and uncontrollable episodes of deep sleepnarcolepsy - a sleep disorder characterized by sudden and uncontrollable episodes of deep sleep; "he believes that narcolepsy is attributable to an inability to suppress REM sleep during waking"
hypersomnia - an inability to stay awake
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

narcolepsy

[ˈnɑːkəʊlepsɪ] Nnarcolepsia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

narcolepsy

[ˈnɑːrkəlɛpsi] nnarcolepsie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

nar·co·lep·sy

[MIM*161400]
n. narcolepsia, padecimiento crónico de accesos de sueño.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

narcolepsy

n narcolepsia
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Part of the complicated biology of human sleep, narcoleptics' bodies mistakenly believe that intense emotion means it's REM sleep, and their muscles relax into a sleep state.
"A lot of narcoleptics don't work and I pay a high price for working as it takes up all my energy.
Now, the same UCLA team has reported that an excess of another brain cell type- this one containing histamine - may be the cause of the loss of hypocretin cells in human narcoleptics.
Until recently, this reputation barred narcoleptics from an effective treatment.
"This current finding explains prior work in humans that found that narcoleptics lack the arousing response to light, unlike other equally sleepy individuals, and that both narcoleptics and Parkinson's patients have an increased tendency to be depressed compared to others with chronic illnesses," said Siegel, who is also a member of the UCLA Brain Research Institute and chief of neurobiology research at the Sepulveda Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Mission Hills, Calif.
There has been a strong association observed with HLA DQB1 0602/DRB1 1501, which is particularly prevalent when cataplexy is present (11); over 90 per cent of narcoleptics with cataplexy express this marker, but it is also seen in approximately 1/10--1/3 of the general population.
Famous narcoleptics include actress Natasha Kinski, footballer Aaron Flahavan, former Clinton adviser Harold Ickes and American television host Jimmy Kimmel.
Like many narcoleptics, she has also had to deal with the associated problem of cataplexy, when a person suffers a complete collapse triggered by sudden laughter, anger or surprise.
The film follows three UK narcoleptics to the US for a seminar to learn about alternative treatments.
"With narcoleptics, it cannot be overemphasized that it's got to be naps before drugs," he said at the meeting sponsored by the Annenberg Center for Health Sciences.
The importance of the correct terminology is that patients without narcolepsy will not benefit from antidepressants or the drug sodium oxybate in addition to pro-awakeness drugs, where as narcoleptics will.
If approval is granted, sodium oxybate's expanded indication would make it the first drug approved for treatment of all the primary symptoms of narcolepsy: excessive daytime sleepiness; fragmented sleep; and cataplexy, the sudden, brief loss of muscle tone frequently experienced by narcoleptics during periods of emotional intensity such as surprise, laughter, or anger.