narcosis


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to narcosis: carbon dioxide narcosis

nar·co·sis

 (när-kō′sĭs)
n. pl. nar·co·ses (-sēz)
A condition of deep stupor or unconsciousness produced by a drug or other chemical substance.

[New Latin narcōsis, from Greek narkōsis, a numbing, from narkoun, to benumb, from narkē, numbness.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

narcosis

(nɑːˈkəʊsɪs)
n
(Medicine) unconsciousness induced by narcotics or general anaesthetics
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

nar•co•sis

(nɑrˈkoʊ sɪs)

n.
a state of drowsiness or stupor.
[1685–95; < New Latin < Greek nárkōsis= narkō-, variant s. of narkoûn to make numb, derivative of nárkē numbness + -sis -sis]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

narcosis, narcoma

a condition of stupor or unconsciousness induced by drugs.
See also: Drugs
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.narcosis - unconsciousness induced by narcotics or anesthesia
unconsciousness - a state lacking normal awareness of the self or environment
nitrogen narcosis - confused or stuporous state caused by high levels of dissolved nitrogen in the blood; "deep-sea divers can suffer nitrogen narcosis from breathing air under high pressure"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

narcosis

[nɑːˈkəʊsɪs] Nnarcosis f, narcotismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

narcosis

nNarkose f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

nar·co·sis

n. narcosis.
1. letargo y alivio de dolor por el efecto de narcóticos;
2. drogadicción.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, the AOP for membrane disruption (narcosis) leading to respiratory failure is a non-specific toxicity characterized by generalized depression in biological activity that can lead to hypoxia and death for which probabilistic qAOPs exist.
People around took me to hospital, where I woke up after narcosis. I was extremely happy to stay alive," Ridvan recollects.
Insomnia and narcosis or drowsiness caused by drugs also pose danger to drivers and pedestrians.
Globally, narcosis, handling and application of GPS collars appeared to have an effect on the spatial behaviour of red deer hinds for a period no longer than 10 days.
The mysterious yet reliable Podarick then delves into the depths of DBS (guaranteed narcosis free).
Because the process is continuing with new tools and is a growing challenge, Wu recommends, "If we desire a future that avoids the enslavement of the propaganda state as well as the narcosis of the consumer and the celebrity culture, we must first acknowledge the preciousness of our attention..."
For a scuba diver, a Deep Dive could be better understanding the capabilities and limitations of human performance or the depth at which nitrogen narcosis begins to set in.
It is likely that similar responses to those observed in fish, such as taxis and immobilization (narcosis to tetany), are induced in frogs.