narrate

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nar·rate

 (năr′āt′, nă-rāt′)
tr.v. nar·rat·ed, nar·rat·ing, nar·rates
1. To give an account of (events, for example) in speech or writing or by means of images. See Synonyms at describe.
2. To supply a running commentary for (a documentary or performance, for example).

[Latin narrāre, narrāt-, from gnārus, knowing; see gnō- in Indo-European roots.]

nar′rat·a·bil′i·ty n.
nar′rat·a·ble adj.

narrate

(nəˈreɪt)
vb
1. to tell (a story); relate
2. (Film) to speak in accompaniment of (a film, television programme, etc)
[C17: from Latin narrāre to recount, from gnārus knowing]
narˈratable adj

nar•rate

(ˈnær eɪt, næˈreɪt)

v. -rat•ed, -rat•ing. v.t.
1. to give an account or tell the story of (events, experiences, etc.).
2. to add a spoken commentary to (a film, television program, etc.).
v.i.
3. to relate or recount events, experiences, etc., in speech or writing.
[1650–60; < Latin narrātus, past participle of narrāre to relate, tell, say, derivative of (g)nārus knowing, acquainted with; akin to cognition]

narrate


Past participle: narrated
Gerund: narrating

Imperative
narrate
narrate
Present
I narrate
you narrate
he/she/it narrates
we narrate
you narrate
they narrate
Preterite
I narrated
you narrated
he/she/it narrated
we narrated
you narrated
they narrated
Present Continuous
I am narrating
you are narrating
he/she/it is narrating
we are narrating
you are narrating
they are narrating
Present Perfect
I have narrated
you have narrated
he/she/it has narrated
we have narrated
you have narrated
they have narrated
Past Continuous
I was narrating
you were narrating
he/she/it was narrating
we were narrating
you were narrating
they were narrating
Past Perfect
I had narrated
you had narrated
he/she/it had narrated
we had narrated
you had narrated
they had narrated
Future
I will narrate
you will narrate
he/she/it will narrate
we will narrate
you will narrate
they will narrate
Future Perfect
I will have narrated
you will have narrated
he/she/it will have narrated
we will have narrated
you will have narrated
they will have narrated
Future Continuous
I will be narrating
you will be narrating
he/she/it will be narrating
we will be narrating
you will be narrating
they will be narrating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been narrating
you have been narrating
he/she/it has been narrating
we have been narrating
you have been narrating
they have been narrating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been narrating
you will have been narrating
he/she/it will have been narrating
we will have been narrating
you will have been narrating
they will have been narrating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been narrating
you had been narrating
he/she/it had been narrating
we had been narrating
you had been narrating
they had been narrating
Conditional
I would narrate
you would narrate
he/she/it would narrate
we would narrate
you would narrate
they would narrate
Past Conditional
I would have narrated
you would have narrated
he/she/it would have narrated
we would have narrated
you would have narrated
they would have narrated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.narrate - provide commentary for a film, for example
inform - impart knowledge of some fact, state or affairs, or event to; "I informed him of his rights"
2.narrate - narrate or give a detailed account ofnarrate - narrate or give a detailed account of; "Tell what happened"; "The father told a story to his child"
inform - impart knowledge of some fact, state or affairs, or event to; "I informed him of his rights"
relate - give an account of; "The witness related the events"
crack - tell spontaneously; "crack a joke"
yarn - tell or spin a yarn
rhapsodise, rhapsodize - recite a rhapsody

narrate

verb tell, recount, report, detail, describe, relate, unfold, chronicle, recite, set forth The film is a story about power, narrated by an old sailor.

narrate

verb
To give a verbal account of:
Translations
vyprávětvypravovat
fortælle
kertoa
elbeszélelmond
segja sögu
atpasakotikomentavimaspasakotipasakotojas
pārstāstītstāstīt
anlatmak

narrate

[nəˈreɪt] VT [+ documentary] → narrar, hacer los comentarios de; [+ story] → narrar, relatar

narrate

[nəˈreɪt] vtraconter, narrer

narrate

vterzählen; events, journey etcschildern

narrate

[nəˈreɪt] vtnarrare, raccontare

narrate

(nəˈreit) verb
to tell (a story). He narrated the events of the afternoon.
narˈration noun
narrative (ˈnarətiv) noun
a story. an exciting narrative.
narˈrator noun
1. a person who tells a story.
2. a person who tells you what is happening or explains something in a film.
References in periodicals archive ?
Notwithstanding its eccentricities, the story of Ernestine's life has much of the neatness and closure of a traditional Bildungsroman, consisting of a narratable sequence of defining events that have made her what she is--namely, an independent, hardened, unfeminine (in a word, "New") woman.
Lyrics and recordings, especially given their propensity to be reuttered or reread or replayed, convert chronology into cyclical sameness and so allow memorable repetition to undermine narratable individual selfhood.
The difference not only lies in the contrast between the narratable and the unnarratable, but also resides in the fact that the submerged plot goes in the same thematic direction with the surface plot.
History, in other words, is perceived as having an intrinsic narratable order.
Just so, in her concluding studies focusing upon refugee narratives, Whitlock uses the work of Edwidge Danticat and others to dramatize how the global infrastructure of human rights and humanitarianism has turned the refugee into a narratable identity only through restrictions and exclusions.
The shift from Low to High culture has had a major impact on the ways in which past, present and future are articulated into a narratable memoryscape, and it has also changed our relation to modernity.
I have been for a long time", calls to mind Delbo's words, "I died at Auschwitz, but no one knows it" and Ernst van Alphen's (35) observation that "the basic feeling of being dead, or of continuing living as a dead person, is not narratable [.
Each page bears a wealth of diverse knowledge-not subordinated but not narratable.
In fact, in that nation and narrative are mutually self-constituting, they mark the limit into which form and content dissolve into one; as Koselleck has argued, the turn towards the history-as-progress narrative in eighteenth-century Europe converted the very notion of the "republic" from a structural condition to a narratable event.
When Tillich concedes that "this tension does not always reach the strength of a struggle; but latently, it is always present," he opens the way towards imagining the relationship between the two terms as it actually works in the film: if this tension is constitutional, it nevertheless exists in variable degrees depending on circumstances over time; if that tension is also latent, that is, existing but not yet developed or manifest, it exists as the least degree of tension; as a result, we configure that relationship not as a static hierarchy in which faith is privileged over doubt, but as a dynamic process, as an always narratable movement along a continuum between faith and doubt.
The source of Tom's pleasure becomes narratable when the readers are introduced to the possibility that seeing the man looking like a businessman but assuming that he is really a detective, reminds Tom of his own performance as Tom.
However from this example, we can recognise how misattunements manifest as different orientations towards objects (some of which might be narratable as failed orientations).