narratology

(redirected from narratologists)

narratology

(ˌnærəˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the study of narrative and narrative structure
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References in periodicals archive ?
The first possible negative consequence, according to Wolf, is that narratologists expanding narrative investigation into territories with which they are not familiar tend to "erroneously overstress similarities," which can possibly devalue the concept of narrativity, since they tend to expect "an equal narrative potential in all media" (513).
An October 2014 conference in Amsterdam was the last of a series in which linguists and narratologists working with the classics joined forces to explore textual strategies in Greek and Latin war narrative.
While there is no singular consensus on the formal elements of a story, and it is still common to debate whether particular texts qualify or not, narratologists, from Aristotle to Roland Barthes to David Herman, have identified certain standard elements.
Unlike most unnatural narratologists who are confined to the typology contest of natural narratology and unnatural narratology, Macro Caracciolo bypasses it by adopting an innovative approach toward the construction of unnatural narratology.
She challenges the conflation of "natural" and "mimetic," as well as "unnatural" and "anti-mimetic," that she sees framing the approach of unnatural narratologists. In the same issue, Alber, et al.
Cognitive and evolutionary narratologists (such as Patrick Colm Hogan or Brian Boyd) will tell you that they capture universal human concerns and interpersonal relations that are fundamental to the human experience.
More intent on leading his life rather than documenting it, Carlebach consequently lived mainly through the stories of others, becoming the center of a variety of worldviews and fitting a range of what narratologists might recognize as motifs: Carlebach as the descendant of "a long line of rabbis," as a child prodigy, as a Holocaust escapee, as a Hasidic revivalist, as an authentic Hasid, as a troubled Hasid, as a Holy Beggar, as a folksinger, as an interventionist, as enabling the best in people, as an untrained musician, as a singing/dancing rabbi, as a selfless giver, as a Lamed Vavnik, as an Orthodox deviant, as a neo-Kabbalist, as a storyteller, and so on and so forth.
The goal of the Intelligent Narrative Technologies workshop was to bring together a diverse community of computer scientists, narratologists, psychologists, artists, and game industry practitioners to discuss the generation, analysis, and understanding of interactive and noninteractive stories.
With an emphasis on features such as modes of discourse, points of view, framing devices, and footnotes, narratologists have long been devoted to the scrutiny of texts' structural DNA.
This emphasis on the sense-making activity of the reader brings the cognitive narratologists close to issues at home in the hermeneutic tradition, the leading theoreticians of which seem hardly to share the cognitivists' ambition to build bridges between the human and the natural sciences.
While this definition has long been institutionalized, its postulation of the 'implied author' has never ceased to be a bone of contention between rhetorical narratologists and structuralist/cognitive narratologists.