narratology


Also found in: Wikipedia.

narratology

(ˌnærəˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the study of narrative and narrative structure
References in periodicals archive ?
Second, Western structural narratology, with all its intricate systematicity, has been questioned from a growing diversity of perspectives amid new theoretic trends.
These forms of narrative have been critically read understood and interpreted in the field of narratology.
He uses narratology and intertextuality as his main tools, and takes a broad perspective by comparing Josephus with epistolary practices in classical and Hellenistic Greek literature.
Premised on the assertion that stories open and foreclose ways of thinking and being, Letting Stories Breathe extends the literary study of narratology to include the storied quality of everyday life.
In this section, we present six qualitative research traditions: grounded theory, phenomenology, consensual qualitative research (CQR), ethnography, narratology, and participatory action research (PAR).
The volume contains several perspectives on the history of narratology in combination with comments on the history of separate narrative genres, such as the Western, the detective story, science fiction (Brian McHale), film (James Morrison), and digital media (Scott Rettberg and Jill Walkert Rettberg).
As part of the justification of studying narrative aspects of lyric poetry, reference is made to contemporary paradigms in postclassical narratology of which transgeneric narratology is one.
In the wake of the pioneering work of Gerard Genette and Mieke Bal in the 1970s, narratology was enthusiastically embraced by classical scholars working in the areas of epic, historiography, and the ancient novel.
Branch's methodology is narratology (characterization setting, conflict, and point of view), and she invites readers to active participation by imagining the scene with the characters and applying the message of the story to one's life.
Thus representing a major metamutation in the gene pool of post-humanist discourse, Clarke's book ambitiously synthesizes neocybernetic systems theory with narratology, joining the two fields by focusing critically on the figure of the posthuman metamorph in all its guises.
The publication here reviewed has its origin in the Narratology Seminar convened by John Pier and J.A.