narrator

(redirected from narratorial)
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nar·ra·tor

 (năr′ā′tər, -ə-tər)
n.
1. A person who narrates, such as one who provides off-screen commentary in a documentary.
2.
a. A character in literature, especially a novel or short story, who relates the plot and sometimes plays a role in the story.
b. A character in a fictional movie, play, or similar production who comments on what is happening, often through voice-over.

narrator

(nəˈreɪtə)
n
1. a person who tells a story or gives an account of something
2. (Film) a person who speaks in accompaniment of a film, television programme, etc

nar•ra•tor

(ˈnær eɪ tər, ˈnær ə-, næˈreɪ-)
n.
1. one who tells a story or recounts a series of events, aloud or in writing.
2. one who provides spoken commentary for a film, television program, etc.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.narrator - someone who tells a storynarrator - someone who tells a story    
anecdotist, raconteur - a person skilled in telling anecdotes
fabulist - a person who tells or invents fables
griot - a storyteller in West Africa; perpetuates the oral traditions of a family or village
speaker, talker, verbaliser, verbalizer, utterer - someone who expresses in language; someone who talks (especially someone who delivers a public speech or someone especially garrulous); "the speaker at commencement"; "an utterer of useful maxims"

narrator

noun storyteller, writer, author, reporter, commentator, chronicler, reciter, raconteur Jules, the story's narrator, is an actress in her late thirties.
Translations
راوٍ، قاصٌّراوٍ، مُفَسِّر
vypravěčkomentátor
fortællerkommentator
pripovjedačpripovjedačica
narrátor
sögumaîur
anlatan kimsehikayeciöykücü

narrator

[nəˈreɪtəʳ] N [of story] → narrador(a) m/f; [of documentary] → narrador(a) m/f, comentarista mf

narrator

[nəˈreɪtər] n [story] → narrateur/trice m/f; [documentary] → narrateur/trice m/f
The narrator and central figure is a salesman called Mike → Le narrateur et protagoniste est un représentant nommé Mike.

narrator

nErzähler(in) m(f); first-person narratorIcherzähler(in) m(f); third-person narratorErerzähler(in) m(f)

narrator

[nəˈreɪtəʳ] nnarratore/trice

narrate

(nəˈreit) verb
to tell (a story). He narrated the events of the afternoon.
narˈration noun
narrative (ˈnarətiv) noun
a story. an exciting narrative.
narˈrator noun
1. a person who tells a story.
2. a person who tells you what is happening or explains something in a film.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, in a narratorial apostrophe, he renders that game of narrative sleight of hand and the rules that subtend it quite explicit indeed:
For example, it would be straightforward to measure which of several plausible themes for a story readers endorse and to examine that choice as a function of the language, plot elements, narratorial comments, and so on.
Narratorial asides in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl suggest that the book was written specifically for Northern white women.
Written rather for the general reader than for those with specialist interests in the development of historical fiction, it is avowedly non-theoretical in its consideration of the plot elements, narratorial perspectives, and socio-political contexts of the sub-genre.
Ma Yuan's works strike the reader, first of all, with a complex interweaving of the narratorial voices, never seen before in Chinese fiction.
As explained in chapter three, |The novel: themes and techniques', Zola himself attempts to absorb at the level of narratorial discourse the paroles of everyday life which invade a novel already tending towards entropy (Baguley's own work is a necessary subtext).
Fie offers a brief analysis of the multiple and incompatible narrating instances (from narrator-character to self-conscious narrator to omnipotent author) suggested by Austen's narratorial intrusions, and of the cacophonous voices produced by Joyce's style, arguing that these voices that undermine any stable or unified presence can only exist in writing.
While one cannot deny the suggestiveness of Pettitt's contextualization, the overall effect of that narrative, in my mind, would seem to support the reading of the narratorial turnabouts--in the spirit of Wilkie Collins's later multiple narrator stories-as intended more for the reader's benefit than the author's, most particularly as a means of inciting and maintaining interest in its mysteries.
The intricate interplay of the two domains in Thomas's Tristan-polarized, I suggest, into opposing systems of knowledge in the poem-is most clearly brought into relief at moments when Thomas names himself as narrator and discusses the provenance and composition of his work; an extended narratorial intervention found in the Douce fragment will be of particular interest in this respect.
One of the most important consequences is best expressed in the following sentence: "When the narratorial functions are operating independently of the character functions, then the narration will be reliable and authoritative" (112).
1) In Mules and Men, her own activity provides the narratorial grid onto which various folk tales are inscribed, whereas in Dust Tracks on a Road Hurston constructs her life such that many events and characters acquire mythic significance; in her folklore, that is, she tells her own story, while in her autobiography, she includes much "lore.
The rational narratorial clamps on the supernatural are as pronounced as ever, but the story itself, like Melmoth the Wanderer, is always threatening to break free of them and become genuinely the story of supernatural confrontation which its narrator is so anxious to discredit' (p.