natural history


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natural history

n.
1. The study and description of organisms and natural objects, especially their origins, evolution, and interrelationships.
2.
a. A collection of facts about the development of a natural process or entity: the natural history of tuberculosis.
b. A work or treatise containing such facts.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

natural history

n
1. (Biology) the study of animals and plants in the wild state
2. (Biology) the study of all natural phenomena
3. (Biology) the sum of these phenomena in a given place or at a given time: the natural history of Iran.
natural historian n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

nat′ural his′tory


n.
the study of organisms and natural objects, esp. with reference to their history and native environment.
[1560–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

natural history

The study and description of living things and natural objects, especially their origins, evolution, and relationships to one another. Natural history includes the sciences of zoology, mineralogy, geology, and paleontology.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.natural history - the scientific study of plants or animals (more observational than experimental) usually published in popular magazines rather than in academic journalsnatural history - the scientific study of plants or animals (more observational than experimental) usually published in popular magazines rather than in academic journals
science, scientific discipline - a particular branch of scientific knowledge; "the science of genetics"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
التّاريخ الطَّبيعي
přírodopis
naturhistorie
természetrajz
náttúrufræîi
prírodopis
doğabilimtabiat bilgisi

natural history

nstoria naturale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

natural

(ˈnӕtʃərəl) adjective
1. of or produced by nature, not made by men. Coal, oil etc are natural resources; Wild animals are happier in their natural state than in a zoo.
2. born in a person. natural beauty; He had a natural ability for music.
3. (of manner) simple, without pretence. a nice, natural smile.
4. normal; as one would expect. It's quite natural for a boy of his age to be interested in girls.
5. of a musical note, not sharp or flat. G natural is lower in pitch than G sharp.
noun
1. a person who is naturally good at something.
2. in music (a sign ( ) indicating) a note which is not to be played sharp or flat.
ˈnaturalist noun
a person who studies animal and plant life.
ˈnaturally adverb
1. of course; as one would expect. Naturally I didn't want to risk missing the train.
2. by nature; as a natural characteristic. She is naturally kind.
3. normally; in a relaxed way. Although he was nervous, he behaved quite naturally.
natural gas
gas suitable for burning, found underground or under the sea.
natural history
the study of plants and animals.
natural resources
sources of energy, wealth etc which occur naturally and are not made by man, eg coal, oil, forests etc.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
As I feel that the opportunities which I enjoyed of studying the Natural History of the different countries we visited, have been wholly due to Captain Fitz Roy, I hope I may here be permitted to repeat my expression of gratitude to him; and to add that, during the five years we were together, I received from him the most cordial friendship and steady assistance.
I told him my name, Edward Prendick, and how I had taken to Natural History as a relief from the dulness of my comfortable independence.
Nor are the most conscientious compilations of Natural History for the benefit of the young and tender, free from the same heinousness of mistake.
In virtue of my office as Assistant Professor in the Museum of Natural History in Paris, the French Government had attached me to that expedition.
NATURAL HISTORY OF THE VALLEY--GOLDEN LIZARDS--TAMENESS OF THE BIRDS--MOSQUITOES--FLIES--DOGS--A SOLITARY CAT--THE CLIMATE--THE COCOANUT TREE--SINGULAR MODES OF CLIMBING IT--AN AGILE YOUNG CHIEF--FEARLESSNESS OF THE CHILDREN--TOO-TOO AND THE COCOANUT TREE--THE BIRDS OF THE VALLEY
"In one moment I've seen what has hitherto been Enveloped in absolute mystery, And without extra charge I will give you at large A Lesson in Natural History."
There were tigers and elephants and bears and wolves and foxes and all the others in the natural history, and for a moment Dorothy was afraid.
All the papers, pamphlets, reports-- all the journals published by the scientific, literary, and religious societies enlarged upon its advantages; and the Society of Natural History of Boston, the Society of Science and Art of Albany, the Geographical and Statistical Society of New York, the Philosophical Society of Philadelphia, and the Smithsonian of Washington sent innumerable letters of congratulation to the Gun Club, together with offers of immediate assistance and money.
His deference to this particular branch of science had induced him to listen to the application of a medical man, whose thirst for natural history had led him to the desire of profiting by the migratory propensities of the squatter.
But everyone is familiar with the magnificent and almost complete specimen in spirits at the Natural History Museum, and the countless drawings that have been made from it; and beyond that the interest of their physiology and structure is purely scientific.
I have never had time to give myself much to natural history. I was early bitten with an interest in structure, and it is what lies most directly in my profession.
Wallace, who is now studying the natural history of the Malay archipelago, has arrived at almost exactly the same general conclusions that I have on the origin of species.

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