natural theology


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natural theology

n.
A theology holding that knowledge of God may be acquired by human reason and observation alone without the aid of revealed knowledge.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

natural theology

n
(Theology) the attempt to derive theological truth, and esp the existence of God, from empirical facts by reasoned argument. Compare revealed religion, fideism, revelation3
natural theologian n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

nat′ural theol′ogy


n.
theology based on knowledge of the natural world and on human reason, apart from revelation.
[1670–80]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.natural theology - a theology that holds that knowledge of God can be acquired by human reason without the aid of divine revelation
theological system, theology - a particular system or school of religious beliefs and teachings; "Jewish theology"; "Roman Catholic theology"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among specific topics are Christ the design of revelation, agents of tradition, the inspiration of scripture, magisterium, natural theology deployed: the existence of God, the credibility of Christ's foundation of the church, human faith and divine faith, and the nature of Catholic theology in the 20th century.
Paper, $27.00--Recognizing that natural theology has always had a place of prominence in Western philosophy, Matthew Levering advances the recent resurgence of publications that seek to demonstrate the existence of God.
Professor Gingras reconstructs the process of the gradual separation of science from theology and religion, showing how God and natural theology became marginalized in the scientific field in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.
Anthony Waterman writes that "in the Christian West, from the 13th to the 18th century, 'economic' thought can be regarded for the most part as a specialized branch of moral theology." (26) Even Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations was likely written as a contribution to Newtonian natural theology: (27) "It is obvious for [Isaac] Newton...
In describing the nature of fundamental theology in terms of communication, I begin by noting that fundamental theology is a 20th-century successor to the older traditions of natural theology and apologetics; its task is to provide a "propaedeutic path to faith." (28) Besides the propaedeutic and apologetic tasks, a third task, with more constructive roots, has emerged as an important agenda of fundamental theology: interreligious dialogue.
This book, his fourth in the science-religion area, is a very competent presentation of the history and current state of scientific cosmology as part of an enterprise of natural theology.
His reflective commentary on the Epistle to the Romans was the result of 10 years' experience as a pastor and it rang a clear warning bell against all 'natural theology' (the use of reason when discussing God).
His Natural Theology is refreshing and his description of Special revelation in Scripture is engaging, Ladario adds little to the long-standing Corpus Theologium of orthodox Catholic teaching by the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith.
Such distinctions play a role in theological aesthetics and natural theology.
Here for example is the entry on natural theology: "Reflection and argument on the natural world to learn about God's nature and will.
also examines how extremists are created (even in elementary schools), the needs of groups, the effects of belief and religions, and the nature and misuse of language supported by tenets blended from neuroanatomy, philosophy, psychology (group and individual), logic, physics, natural theology (absent books), and the nature of mature/immature operational (cognitive) development.
My own strategy will be to draw upon his Gifford Lectures, With the Grain of the Universe: The Church's Witness and Natural Theology, (3) in constructing such an account because it offers his most extensive account of the relationship of the church and the world.