natural virtues

natural virtues

pl n
(Theology) (esp among the scholastics) those virtues of which man is capable without direct help from God, specifically justice, temperance, prudence, and fortitude. Compare theological virtues
References in classic literature ?
"See!" continued the laughing scout, as he pointed toward the remainder of the party, who, in obedience to the signal, were already approaching; "this is music which has its natural virtues; it brings two good rifles to my elbow, to say nothing of the knives and tomahawks.
Plato and other ancient Greek philosophers identified four natural virtues called cardinal virtues on which all others hinge: prudence, temperance, fortitude, and justice.
Now, this entertaining and enlightening compendium is available from Night Lotus Productions with a friendlier title and an adjunct multimedia course that currently offers 300 topics, from "where will you go next," to "Finding the Deeper Calling of your Soul," increasing your natural virtues, seeing the world with new eyes, remembering the cosmic joke, practices for body, mind, and spirit, and much more.
(8.) In Christianity, natural virtues are seen to play a part within a greater whole founded on the theological virtues in general and charity in particular.
As a Catholic priest, Aquinas necessarily rejected the idea that natural virtues could secure the eternal salvation available only through Jesus Christ.
There is plenty of room, in other words, for social and religious conservatives to learn from the sober analyses of the Austrians--the only school of empirical economic thought that takes seriously human dignity, personal responsibility, and the role of the natural virtues in promoting the common good.
The Tuscan Jesuit sought to deny his Tibetan hosts and interlocutors the ability to assert their claims to what Desideri might define as prevenient grace, the assistance given by God to those seeking Him without their direct knowledge, but who gain--by their unwitting good will to seek the ultimate truth--the benefits of natural virtues.
Certain contemporary moralists assume that the nature that persists is "acquired cardinal virtue." Consider the following example from Dell'Olio of how one seamlessly moves from human nature to natural virtues: "A divinized human being is still a human being and thus retains all that belongs to the natural powers of the human being.
Today, the entire process is conducted following not only the strict Norwegian regulations, but also the HACCP international procedures reinforcing the protection of the natural virtues of Ascophyllum Nodosum.
Natural virtues provide non-moral motives for action, i.e.
Hume believes that a certain category of duties, those associated with what he calls the "natural virtues," are generally practiced from what he calls "natural motives" (T 3.2.1,478; T 3.2.6,531).