nature worship


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Related to nature worship: ancestor worship

na′ture wor`ship


n.
a religion based on the deification and worship of natural phenomena.
[1865–70]
na′ture wor`shiper, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nature worship - a system of religion that deifies and worships natural forces and phenomenanature worship - a system of religion that deifies and worships natural forces and phenomena
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
References in periodicals archive ?
Exploring myth, magic, and landscape, he discusses stories based on Arthurian legend and Celtic mythology, such as Gawain and the Green Knight, Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Excalibur, The Owl Service, and Children of the Stones; the legend of Tristan and Isolde in film; stories of sacrificial nature worship and ancient magical practices in Eye of the Devil, The Wicker Man, and Robin Redbreast; witchcraft in productions like The City of the Dead, Night of the Eagle, Witchcraft, The Witches, Theatre of Death, Witchfinder General, Blood on SatanAEs Claw, Wakewood, and Murrain; the theme of Pan in The Devil Rides Out; classical mythology in The Gorgon and Clash of the Titans; fairies in Photographing Fairies; and the subversive aspect of pagan culture in PendaAEs Fen.
Johnson suggested that this could indicate nature worship (Ayala Museum)
It appears to have mutated from halfunderstood gibberish from the usual suspects, creating a poisonous cocktail of nature worship and snobbery.
The tribals and dalits of India have never been part of any particular religion except the animism and nature worship they follow.
I bought a couple books on Wicca and Nature Worship, and found that they encouraged the use of natural drugs so I continued.
Moving from her native Nara to the semitropical island of Amami-Oshima from which her ancestors hail, Kawase embraces nature worship and pompous philosophizing in her indulgently mannered style, which, over the course of two hours, overwhelms a small yet potentially moving story of two teenagers dealing with separation within their families.
Bartlett offers a sample of this in his final "Reflections," where he writes that the cult of the saints was directly aimed neither to the immortal gods or the objects of pagan nature worship, but to dead human beings.
Often derided for their pantheism and nature worship, the lumad hold nature sacred because nature is life-giving.
Yet Jews generally shy away from nature worship, with its echoes of idolatry and paganism.
This direct experience of God through nature is precisely the attitude of modern environmental religion, except that here the worship of God is replaced by nature worship.
In a chapter on American writing, Miller challenges comfortable interpretations of transcendentalist nature worship as a mildly unorthodox revision of Christian reverence for creation or as a prototype of contemporary environmentalism.
If you stop to think about it, would either neo-pantheism or nature worship be all that bad given the current state of affairs of our environment right now?