navigable


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nav·i·ga·ble

 (năv′ĭ-gə-bəl)
adj.
1. Sufficiently deep or wide to provide passage for vessels: navigable waters; a navigable river.
2. Capable of being steered. Used of boats, ships, or aircraft.

nav′i·ga·bil′i·ty, nav′i·ga·ble·ness n.
nav′i·ga·bly adv.

navigable

(ˈnævɪɡəbəl)
adj
1. (Navigation) wide, deep, or safe enough to be sailed on or through: a navigable channel.
2. (Navigation) capable of being steered or controlled: a navigable raft.
ˌnavigaˈbility, ˈnavigableness n
ˈnavigably adv

nav•i•ga•ble

(ˈnæv ɪ gə bəl)

adj.
1. deep and wide enough to provide passage to ships.
2. capable of being steered or guided, as a ship, aircraft, or missile.
[1520–30; < Latin nāvigābilis, derivative of nāvigā(re) to sail]
nav`i•ga•bil′i•ty, nav′i•ga•ble•ness, n.
nav′i•ga•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.navigable - able to be sailed on or through safely; "navigable waters"; "a navigable channel"
passable - able to be passed or traversed or crossed; "the road is passable"

navigable

adjective passable, negotiable, traversable, crossable, open, clear, unobstructed the navigable portion of the Nile

navigable

adjective
Capable of being passed, traversed, or crossed:
Translations
صالِح للمِلاحَه
splavný
farbar
hajózható
skipgengur
ulaşıma izin veren

navigable

[ˈnævɪgəbl] ADJ
1. [river] → navegable
2. [ship, balloon] → gobernable, dirigible

navigable

[ˈnævɪgəbəl] adj [river] → navigable

navigable

adj
schiffbar; in a navigable condition (ship)seetüchtig
balloon, airshiplenkbar

navigable

[ˈnævɪgəbl] adj (river) → navigabile

navigate

(ˈnӕvigeit) verb
1. to direct, guide or move (a ship, aircraft etc) in a particular direction. He navigated the ship through the dangerous rocks.
2. to find or follow one's route when in a ship, aircraft, car etc. If I drive will you navigate?
ˈnavigable adjective
(negative unnavigable) able to be travelled along. a navigable river.
ˌnaviˈgation noun
the art or skill of navigating.
ˈnavigator noun
a person who navigates.
References in classic literature ?
Now the Chamelecon river seems to run to within a short distance of there, but there is no telling how far up it may be navigable.
With the high plain that there interposed itself to the further passage of the water, commenced a portage of as many miles, which conducted the adventurer to the banks of the Hudson, at a point where, with the usual obstructions of the rapids, or rifts, as they were then termed in the language of the country, the river became navigable to the tide.
A Dutch landscape along a navigable river which perfuses it till to the background.
These men painted that hideous wilderness in charming colours, told us that we should find a country watered with navigable rivers, and inhabited by a people that would either inform us of the way, or accompany us in it.
The commerce of the German empire[2] is in continual trammels from the multiplicity of the duties which the several princes and states exact upon the merchandises passing through their territories, by means of which the fine streams and navigable rivers with which Germany is so happily watered are rendered almost useless.
A succession of navigable waters forms a kind of chain round its borders, as if to bind it together; while the most noble rivers in the world, running at convenient distances, present them with highways for the easy communication of friendly aids, and the mutual transportation and exchange of their various commodities.
The State itself is penetrated by a large navigable river for more than fifty leagues.
Strabo saw it navigated: but its decline from the point of departure, near Bubastes, to the Red Sea was so slight that it was only navigable for a few months in the year.
Robert Campbell, formerly of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company, descended the Platte from this fork, in skin canoes, thus proving, what had always been discredited, that the river was navigable.
Here speaks the man of masts and sails, to whom the sea is not a navigable element, but an intimate companion.
From hence, the general course of the river for about seventy miles was nearly southeast; varying in breadth according to its bays and indentations, and navigable for vessels of three hundred tons.
This island seems formed by nature to be the mistress of Greece, for it is entirely surrounded by a navigable ocean which washes almost all the maritime parts of that country, and is not far distant on the one side from Peloponnesus, on the other, which looks towards Asia, from Triopium and Rhodes.