navigator


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nav·i·ga·tor

 (năv′ĭ-gā′tər)
n.
1. One who navigates.
2. A device that directs the course of an aircraft or missile.

navigator

(ˈnævɪˌɡeɪtə)
n
1. (Navigation) a person who is skilled in or performs navigation, esp on a ship or aircraft
2. (Historical Terms) (esp formerly) a person who explores by ship
3. (Aeronautics) an instrument or device for assisting a pilot to navigate an aircraft

nav•i•ga•tor

(ˈnæv ɪˌgeɪ tər)

n.
1. a person who practices, or is skilled in, navigation.
2. a person who conducts explorations by sea.
[1580–90; < Latin nāvigātor sailor. See navigate]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.navigator - the ship's officer in charge of navigationnavigator - the ship's officer in charge of navigation
ship's officer, officer - a person authorized to serve in a position of authority on a vessel; "he is the officer in charge of the ship's engines"
2.navigator - the member of an aircrew who is responsible for the aircraft's course
aircrewman - a member of an aircrew
astrogator - the navigator of a spacecraft
3.navigator - in earlier times, a person who explored by ship
explorer, adventurer - someone who travels into little known regions (especially for some scientific purpose)
Juan Ponce de Leon, Ponce de Leon - Spanish explorer who accompanied Columbus on his second trip in 1493; in 1513 he discovered Florida while searching for the legendary Fountain of Youth (1460-1521)

navigator

noun helmsman, guide, pilot, seaman, mariner, steersman Which of you is the best navigator?

navigator

noun
A person engaged in sailing or working on a ship:
Informal: salt, tar.
Slang: gob.
Translations
مَلاّح، بَحّار
navigátor
navigatør
hajósnavigátor
siglingafræîingur
navigátor
navigator
rota görevlisiseyrüseferci

navigator

[ˈnævɪgeɪtəʳ] N
1. (Naut) (= officer on ship) → oficial mf de derrota, oficial mf de navegación (Aer) → navegante mf (Aut) → copiloto mf
2. (Hist) (= seafarer) → navegador m, navegante m

navigator

[ˈnævɪgeɪtər] nnavigateur/trice m/f

navigator

n (Naut) → Navigationsoffizier(in) m(f); (Aviat) → Navigator(in) m(f); (Mot) → Beifahrer(in) m(f)

navigator

[ˈnævɪˌgeɪtəʳ] n (Naut, Aer) → navigatore m, ufficiale m di rotta; (explorer) → navigatore m (Aut) → secondo pilota m, copilota m/f

navigate

(ˈnӕvigeit) verb
1. to direct, guide or move (a ship, aircraft etc) in a particular direction. He navigated the ship through the dangerous rocks.
2. to find or follow one's route when in a ship, aircraft, car etc. If I drive will you navigate?
ˈnavigable adjective
(negative unnavigable) able to be travelled along. a navigable river.
ˌnaviˈgation noun
the art or skill of navigating.
ˈnavigator noun
a person who navigates.
References in classic literature ?
Why, as I understand it, who am no navigator, the variation was not so definitely and accurately known in those days as now."
Endeavoring to orient himself, as a surveyor or navigator might say, the man moved his eyes slowly along its visible length and at a distance of a quarter-mile to the south of his station saw, dim and gray in the haze, a group of horsemen riding to the north.
Then, chart in hand, we reviewed the travels of the French navigator, his voyages of circumnavigation, his double detention at the South Pole, which led to the discovery of Adelaide and Louis Philippe, and fixing the hydrographical bearings of the principal islands of Oceania.
I am a navigator, and that is more than your Solomons captains are.
Nor did he know it was the head of La Perouse, the doughty old navigator, who had left his bones, the bones of his crews, and the bones of his two frigates, the Astrolabe and the Boussole, on the shores of the cannibal Solomons.
They had laughed at the old navigator's child-like credulity; and yet here stood himself, Bassett, on the rim of an excavation for all the world like the diamond pits of South Africa.
Its passage through this last chain is rough and violent; making repeated falls, and rushing down long and furious rapids, which threaten destruction to the navigator; though a hardy trapper is said to have shot down them in a canoe.
In honour of the Marquess de Mendoza, then viceroy of Peru--under whose auspices the navigator sailed--he bestowed upon them the name which denoted the rank of his patron, and gave to the world on his return a vague and magnificent account of their beauty.
The building had to be long, because the grave of the honored old navigator is two hundred and ten feet long itself!
If the Mediterranean, the venerable (and sometimes atrociously ill- tempered) nurse of all navigators, was to rock my youth, the providing of the cradle necessary for that operation was entrusted by Fate to the most casual assemblage of irresponsible young men(all, however, older than myself) that, as if drunk with Provencal sunshine, frittered life away in joyous levity on the model of Balzac's "Histoire des Treize" qualified by a dash of romance DE CAPE ET D'EPEE.
The extension of our own commerce in our own vessels cannot give pleasure to any nations who possess territories on or near this continent, because the cheapness and excellence of our productions, added to the circumstance of vicinity, and the enterprise and address of our merchants and navigators, will give us a greater share in the advantages which those territories afford, than consists with the wishes or policy of their respective sovereigns.
The fragment of the Critias has given birth to a world-famous fiction, second only in importance to the tale of Troy and the legend of Arthur; and is said as a fact to have inspired some of the early navigators of the sixteenth century.