navvy

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nav·vy

 (năv′ē)
n. pl. nav·vies Chiefly British
A laborer, especially one employed in construction or excavation projects.

[Short for navigator, canal laborer (obsolete).]

navvy

(ˈnævɪ)
n, pl -vies
informal Brit a labourer on a building site, excavations, etc
[C19: shortened from navigator, builder of a navigation (sense 4)]

nav•vy

(ˈnæv i)

n., pl. -vies.
Brit. Informal. an unskilled manual laborer.
[1825–35; earlier, a laborer employed in canal excavation; nav(igator) in same sense (compare obsolete or dial. navigation a canal) + -y2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.navvy - a laborer who is obliged to do menial worknavvy - a laborer who is obliged to do menial work
laborer, labourer, manual laborer, jack - someone who works with their hands; someone engaged in manual labor

navvy

noun labourer, worker, ganger, workman, manual worker, hand He spent 18 months doing navvy's work on a building site.
Translations

navvy

[ˈnævɪ] N (Brit) → peón m caminero

navvy

[ˈnævi] n (British)terrassier m

navvy

n (Brit) → Bauarbeiter(in) m(f); (on road also) → Straßenarbeiter(in) m(f)

navvy

[ˈnævɪ] n (Brit) → sterratore m, manovale m
References in classic literature ?
I felt as a rabbit might feel returning to his burrow and suddenly confronted by the work of a dozen busy navvies digging the foundations of a house.
That which would present no difficulty to a thousand navvies working in open country will be of course more troublesome in a comparatively confined space.
She is consigned to a Father--Boots's Father, who employs five hundred thousand men--and is brought to anchor on Veneering's left; thus affording opportunity to the sportive Tippins on his right (he, as usual, being mere vacant space), to entreat to be told something about those loves of Navvies, and whether they really do live on raw beefsteaks, and drink porter out of their barrows.
When it was made, he took toll upon it; and his heirs still take toll, and the sons of the navvies who dug it and of the engineer who designed it pay the toll when they have occasion to travel by it, or to purchase goods which have been conveyed along it.
Next, they try their hand at making some of Skipton's world-famous pork pies and go fly-fishing, before going their separate ways - with George retracing part of the 2014 Tour de France route and Larry opting for a more sedate history lesson on the navvies who built the magnificent Ribblehead Viaduct.
Some of the most remarkable black and white snaps taken by the now 57-year-old were of navvies working in the canals in Sandwell.
But others came seeking prosperity, or for the first stop on a trip to the New World never completed - storytellers, priests, dockers, poets, navvies, comics and lawyers.
But I guess that's a tribute to those Victorian engineers and navvies who built it - and to the smooth, if soulless, ride today's Northern trains give us.
In the castle grounds at 7am and under the superintendence of Mr Stockdale, chief of the police force, an immense procession was formed and a local newspaper reported they left in the following order: | Twelve navvies on horses, navvies with wheelbarrows, spades and picks; | Then came Mr Crawshay's band Operative masons, Foresters' Club - Little John and his merry men, being represented by Foresters on horseback; | The Glamorganshire Militia Band, Ivorite Clubs, Oddfellows, the First Devon Militia Band, Shipwrights' Club, The Loyal Hibernian Club, Newport Factory Band, Police Force; and | Officers of the Municipal Corporation, David Lewis Esq, Mayor, and John Boyle Esq, trustee to the Marquis of Bute and the Cardiff Corporation.
The nearby 18th century church of St Francis has stained glass windows - unique in the country - showing navvies building the reservoir.
The show, based on the tough navvies who built the spectacular Ribblehead rail viaduct in the Yorkshire Dales in the 1870s, drew 3.
The problem is, none of the navvies will go near it because they reckon the mine is cursed.