nebulosity


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neb·u·los·i·ty

 (nĕb′yə-lŏs′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. neb·u·los·i·ties
1. The quality or condition of being nebulous.
2. Astronomy
a. A nebula or a nebulalike object.
b. A mass of material constituting a nebula.

nebulosity

(ˌnɛbjʊˈlɒsɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the state or quality of being nebulous
2. (Astronomy) astronomy a nebula

neb•u•los•i•ty

(ˌnɛb yəˈlɒs ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. cloudy or cloudlike matter.
2. a nebulous form, shape, or mass.
3. the state or condition of being nebulous.
[1755–65; < Late Latin nebulōsitās]
References in classic literature ?
When she came close and looked in she beheld indistinct forms racing up and down to the figure of the dance, the silence of their footfalls arising from their being overshoe in "scroff"--that is to say, the powdery residuum from the storage of peat and other products, the stirring of which by their turbulent feet created the nebulosity that involved the scene.
Alnitak (below center), the easternmost star in Orion's Belt, anchors a rich region of nebulosity that features the broad glow of IC 434, with the Horsehead Nebula (Barnard 33) silhouetted against it, and the Flame Nebula (NGC 2024) at bottom center.
We can look into Orion A's dark molecular clouds and spot many hidden treasures, including discs of material that could give birth to new stars (pre-stellar discs), nebulosity associated with newly-born stars (Herbig-Haro objects), smaller star clusters and even galaxy clusters lying far beyond the Milky Way.
The current government in Macedonia is making effort with new investigations, allegedly inspired by someone's new evidence, but are in fact the same old nebulosity, to maintain the conspiracy theory--that someone far away was involved and crashed the place which President Boris Trajkovski died in, reads the editorial commentary in Sloboden Pecat.
Star members covered in nebulosity indicate more faint stars.
If you train any telescope or pair of binoculars at this spot, you will see an intricate web of nebulosity, over several degrees wide, with several hot, young stars at its centre.
William Herschel discovered the nebula in 1784, but I have been unable to find out who coined the name 'The Veil Nebula', though some use the name 'The Bridal Veil Nebula'--I suppose alluding to the wispy nature of the loop of nebulosity.
The picture shows a wealth of detail including several nodes of Hydrogen Alpha nebulosity denoting star forming regions showing up red in the outer spiral arms.
Initially the shock wave was moving at millions of kilometres per hour, but as it expanded through space it ploughed through the gas between the stars, which has slowed it considerably and created strangely shaped folds of nebulosity.
Binoculars will show a huge 2[degrees] glow, studded with stars and divided into sections by wisps of dark nebulosity.
great loop of nebulosity, being alive just as they are.
Gendler's photo not only captures the North America Nebula, it places it an unfamiliar context by showing the whole region wreathed in wispy nebulosity.