eugenics

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Related to negative eugenics: positive eugenics

eu·gen·ics

 (yo͞o-jĕn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study or practice of attempting to improve the human gene pool by encouraging the reproduction of people considered to have desirable traits and discouraging or preventing the reproduction of people considered to have undesirable traits.

eu·gen′ic adj.
eu·gen′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

eugenics

(juːˈdʒɛnɪks)
n
(Genetics) (functioning as singular) the study of methods of improving the quality of the human race, esp by selective breeding
[C19: from Greek eugenēs well-born, from eu- + -genēs born; see -gen]
euˈgenic, euˈgenical adj
euˈgenically adv
euˈgenicist, euˈgenecist n
eugenist n, adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

eu•gen•ics

(yuˈdʒɛn ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
a science concerned with improving a species, esp. the human species, by such means as influencing or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have desirable genetic traits.
[1880–85]
eu•gen′i•cist (-ə sɪst) n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

eugenics

the science of improving a breed or species through the careful selection of parents. — eugenicist, n. — eugenic, adj.
See also: Improvement
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eugenics - the study of methods of improving genetic qualities by selective breeding (especially as applied to human mating)
bioscience, life science - any of the branches of natural science dealing with the structure and behavior of living organisms
cacogenics, dysgenics - the study of the operation of factors causing degeneration in the type of offspring produced
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

eugenics

[juːˈdʒenɪks] NSINGeugenesia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

eugenics

[juːˈdʒɛnɪks] neugénisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

eugenics

n singEugenik f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

eugenics

[juːˈdʒɛnɪks] nsgeugenica
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

eu·gen·ics

n. eugenesia, ciencia que estudia el mejoramiento de la especie humana de acuerdo con las leyes biológicas de la herencia.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
This racist attempt to deny citizenship to a child born to an immigrant parent is another attempt to control a woman's right to parent, and it reeks of negative eugenics and reinforces the narrative of who is considered an "unfit" mother.
Biological eugenics can also take two forms: negative eugenics, in which it is sought to avoid the birth of people with undesirable genetic characteristics or traits.
(14) He used his knowledge to explicitly adapt theories of Malthusian checks toward negative eugenics, arguing in 1912 that "[t]he particular difficulties therefore which Malthus foresaw no longer face us.
to give to the more suitable races or strains of blood a better chance of prevailing speedily over the less suitable than they otherwise would have had." (14) Galton believed humanity could be perfected through the gradual extinction of inferior "races," (15) and by his later years--the early twentieth century--had refined his definition of eugenics as simply "the science which deals with all influences that improve the inborn qualities of a race; also with those that develop them to the utmost advantage." (16) Galton's eugenic aspirations begat two core prescriptions: (1) "society ought to foster the breeding of those who possessed favorable traits" (positive eugenics); and (2) "discourage or prevent the breeding of those who did not" (negative eugenics).
Negative eugenics is aimed at discouraging reproduction among those with hereditary traits perceived as poor, the so-called "unfit" or genetically disadvantaged.
Galton distinguished between two methods in eugenics: positive and negative eugenics. Positive eugenics endorses mentally and physically fit individuals to over-reproduce.
As a stronghold of anarchist eugenic thought, Barcelona represented the place where the anarchist eugenics movement had evolved from negative eugenics based on heredity to a supposedly positive eugenics defined by maternalism.
The measures to promote the breeding of the best with the best were known as positive eugenics, and the attempts to dissuade the inferior from breeding were known as negative eugenics. In its earliest manifestation eugenics enjoyed widespread popularity from left, centre and right.
Moreover, the offshoot of eugenics (fostering excellence in society and the human species through selective breeding of admirable traits) championed by the statistician Francis Galton, was dysgenics (or negative eugenics).
But between 1917 and 1920, Sanger would begin to embrace "negative eugenics," which aimed to discourage breeding among the less-eminent members of society.
Glad gives many examples of Jews who were prominent in these, such as the radical activist Emma Goldman who was arrested on a morals charge for distributing a 4-page pamphlet in English and Yiddish entitled "Why and How the Poor Should Not Have So Many Children" which strongly advocated negative eugenics (p.
Eugenicists argued that if a nation developed methods to ensure that those with desired characteristics bred in greater numbers (termed "positive eugenics") while at the same time diminishing the breeding of those with undesirable characteristics (termed "negative eugenics"), the species would be improved (Kevles, 1985).