nelson


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Related to nelson: Nelson Mandela

nel·son

 (nĕl′sən)
n.
Any of several wrestling holds in which the user places an arm under the opponent's upper arm or armpit and presses the wrist or the palm of the hand against the back of the opponent's neck.

[Perhaps from the name Nelson.]

nelson

(ˈnɛlsən)
n
(Wrestling) any wrestling hold in which a wrestler places his or her arm or arms under the opponent's arm or arms from behind and exerts pressure with the palms on the back of the opponent's neck. See full nelson, half-nelson
[C19: from a proper name]

Nelson

(ˈnɛlsən)
n
1. (Placename) a town in NW England, in E Lancashire: textile industry. Pop: 28 998 (2001)
2. (Placename) a port in New Zealand, on N South Island on Tasman Bay. Pop: 45 300 (2004 est)
3. (Placename) River Nelson a river in central Canada, in N central Manitoba, flowing from Lake Winnipeg northeast to Hudson Bay. Length: about 650 km (400 miles)

Nelson

(ˈnɛlsən)
n
1. (Biography) Horatio, Viscount Nelson. 1758–1805, British naval commander during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. He became rear admiral in 1797 after the battle of Cape St Vincent and in 1798 almost destroyed the French fleet at the battle of the Nile. He was killed at Trafalgar (1805) after defeating Villeneuve's fleet
2. (Biography) Willie. born 1933, US country singer and songwriter

nel•son

(ˈnɛl sən)

n.
a wrestling hold in which pressure is applied to the head, back of the neck, and one or both arms of the opponent. Compare full nelson, half nelson.
[1885–90; orig. uncertain]

Nel•son

(ˈnɛl sən)

n.
1. Viscount Horatio, 1758–1805, British admiral.
2. a river in central Canada, flowing NE from Lake Winnipeg to Hudson Bay. 400 mi. (645 km) long.
3. a seaport on N South Island, in New Zealand. 45,200.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nelson - English admiral who defeated the French fleets of Napoleon but was mortally wounded at Trafalgar (1758-1805)Nelson - English admiral who defeated the French fleets of Napoleon but was mortally wounded at Trafalgar (1758-1805)
2.nelson - any of several wrestling holds in which an arm is passed under the opponent's arm from behind and the hand exerts pressure on the back of the neck
wrestling hold - a hold used in the sport of wrestling
full nelson - a wrestling hold in which the holder puts both arms under the opponent's arms and exerts pressure on the back of the neck (illegal in amateur wrestling)
half nelson - a wrestling hold in which the holder puts an arm under the opponent's arm and exerts pressure on the back of the neck
Translations

nelson

[ˈnelsən] N (Wrestling) full nelsonllave f
half nelsonmedia llave f
to put a half nelson on sb (fig) → ponerle trabas a algn

nelson

n (Wrestling) → Nelson m
References in classic literature ?
So Edith Nelson went back to the terrible cabin with its endless alternating four-hour watches.
Hans Nelson was half a second behind his wife in rising to the unexpected.
Nelson, "Young Scratch" they called him, to distinguish him from "Old Scratch," his father, sailed in the sloop Reindeer, partners with one "Clam." Clam was a dare-devil, but Nelson was a reckless maniac.
We have this on the authority of a distinguished seaman of Nelson's time.
And although there was no Boswell near to make these conversations live again, the poet's nephew, Henry Nelson Coleridge, gathered some of his sayings together into a book which he called Table Talk.
From Cockspur Street to Nelson's Monument the men were lined up in a long queue, making their way to the recruiting office.
But high above the flying scud and dark-rolling clouds, there floated a little isle of sunlight, from which beamed forth an angel's face; and this bright face shed a distinct spot of radiance upon the ship's tossed deck, something like that silver plate now inserted into the Victory's plank where Nelson fell.
After other interesting exercises, including an invocation from Bishop Nelson, of Georgia, a dedicatory ode by Albert Howell, Jr., and addresses by the President of the Exposition and Mrs.
Nelson. Her children were living and married and happy, but she had given up her home, sold it--the pretty place with the hospitable yard that used to seem to be fairly spilling over with wholesome, boisterous boys and chatty, beribboned little girls.
Our course now ran down Nine Elms until we came to Broderick and Nelson's large timber-yard, just past the White Eagle tavern.
When we speak of Clive, Nelson, and Putnam as men who "didn't know what fear was," we ought always to add the flea--and put him at the head of the procession.
He threw up the windows, he rushed out of doors into the December air, and greeted every one who spoke to him with an eager gaiety, as if there had been news of a fresh Nelson victory.