neo-


Also found in: Medical, Acronyms.

neo-

(word root) new
Examples of words with the root neo-: neonatal
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

neo-

pref.
1. New; recent: Neolithic.
2.
a. New and different: neoimpressionism.
b. New and abnormal: neoplasm.
3. New World: Neotropical.
4. Young: neoteny.

[Greek, from neos, new, young; see newo- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

neo-

or sometimes before a vowel

ne-

combining form
1. (sometimes capital) new, recent, or a new or modern form or development: neoclassicism; neocolonialism.
2. (Geological Science) (usually capital) the most recent subdivision of a geological period: Neogene.
[from Greek neos new]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

neo-

1. a combining form meaning “new,” “recent,” “revived,” “modified”: Neolithic; neoorthodoxy; neophyte.
2. a combining form used in the names of isomers having a carbon atom attached to four carbon atoms: neoarsphenamine.
Also, esp. before a vowel,ne-.
[< Greek, comb. form of néos; akin to new]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

neo-

[ˈniːəʊ-] prefixnéo-
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

neo-

prefneo-, Neo-;
neoclassical
neoclassicism
nKlassizismus m
neocolonial
adjneokolonialistisch
neocolonialism
nNeokolonialismus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
And yet, this collection can be regarded as a representative compilation addressing different kinds of Neo-
This in turn depends, as Michel Foucault (2008) among others noted, on the constitution of economic and political subjects who can govern themselves in line with (neo-)liberal principles within an institutional framework that they accept as legitimate and that, by accident or design, maximises the scope for formally free choice.
Weimar modernity was the result of a shifting complex, through the nineteenth century, of interactions between Enlightenment and (neo-) Romantic positions: Where the Enlightenment concept of identity was an open-ended process of transformation fed by curiosity about "the world out there," the poet-critics of the Romantic period sought a final transformation of identity as rebirth into a "true" self, both individual and collective.