neoclassical


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ne·o·clas·si·cism

also Ne·o·clas·si·cism  (nē′ō-klăs′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. A revival of classical aesthetics and forms, especially:
a. A revival in literature in the late 1600s and 1700s, characterized by a regard for the classical ideals of reason, form, and restraint.
b. A revival in the 1700s and 1800s in architecture and art, especially in the decorative arts, characterized by order, symmetry, and simplicity of style.
c. A movement in music lasting roughly from 1915 to 1940 that sought to avoid subjective emotionalism and to return to the style of the pre-Romantic composers.
2. Any of various intellectual movements that embrace a set of traditional principles regarded as fundamental or authoritative.

ne′o·clas′sic, ne′o·clas′si·cal adj.
ne′o·clas′si·cist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

neoclassical

(ˌniːəʊˈklæsɪkəl) or

neoclassic

adj
1. (Art Movements) of, relating to, or in the style of neoclassicism in art, architecture, etc
2. (Classical Music) of, relating to, or in the style of neoclassicism in music
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.neoclassical - characteristic of a revival of an earlier classical style
classical, classic - of or relating to the most highly developed stage of an earlier civilisation and its culture; "classic Cinese pottery"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

neoclassical

[ˈniːəʊˈklæsɪkəl] ADJneoclásico
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

neoclassical

neo-classical [ˌniːəʊˈklæsɪkəl] adj [art, architecture, style] → néoclassique
The building was erected between 1798 and 1802 in the neoclassical style of the time → Le bâtiment fut érigé entre 1798 et 1802, dans le style néoclassique de l'époque.neo-conservative [ˌniːəʊkənˈsɜːrvətɪv]
nnéoconservateur/trice m/f
adjnéoconservateur/trice
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

neoclassical

[ˌniːəʊˈklæsɪkl] adjneoclassico/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
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You would be forgiven for thinking you had accidentally stumbled into a physics class, where the graphs describe the behaviour of atoms, not human beings--except that, in this post-modern era, even physics admits more uncertainty and chaos than neoclassical economics.