neoclassical


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ne·o·clas·si·cism

also Ne·o·clas·si·cism  (nē′ō-klăs′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. A revival of classical aesthetics and forms, especially:
a. A revival in literature in the late 1600s and 1700s, characterized by a regard for the classical ideals of reason, form, and restraint.
b. A revival in the 1700s and 1800s in architecture and art, especially in the decorative arts, characterized by order, symmetry, and simplicity of style.
c. A movement in music lasting roughly from 1915 to 1940 that sought to avoid subjective emotionalism and to return to the style of the pre-Romantic composers.
2. Any of various intellectual movements that embrace a set of traditional principles regarded as fundamental or authoritative.

ne′o·clas′sic, ne′o·clas′si·cal adj.
ne′o·clas′si·cist n.

neoclassical

(ˌniːəʊˈklæsɪkəl) or

neoclassic

adj
1. (Art Movements) of, relating to, or in the style of neoclassicism in art, architecture, etc
2. (Classical Music) of, relating to, or in the style of neoclassicism in music
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.neoclassical - characteristic of a revival of an earlier classical style
classical, classic - of or relating to the most highly developed stage of an earlier civilisation and its culture; "classic Cinese pottery"
Translations

neoclassical

[ˈniːəʊˈklæsɪkəl] ADJneoclásico

neoclassical

neo-classical [ˌniːəʊˈklæsɪkəl] adj [art, architecture, style] → néoclassique
The building was erected between 1798 and 1802 in the neoclassical style of the time → Le bâtiment fut érigé entre 1798 et 1802, dans le style néoclassique de l'époque.neo-conservative [ˌniːəʊkənˈsɜːrvətɪv]
nnéoconservateur/trice m/f
adjnéoconservateur/trice

neoclassical

[ˌniːəʊˈklæsɪkl] adjneoclassico/a
References in periodicals archive ?
Its target audience are readers with at least an intermediate familiarity with neoclassical mainstream economic analysis and who have had little to no exposure to the Austrian framework.
Contending Economic Theories: Neoclassical, Keynesian, and Marxian.
You would be forgiven for thinking you had accidentally stumbled into a physics class, where the graphs describe the behaviour of atoms, not human beings--except that, in this post-modern era, even physics admits more uncertainty and chaos than neoclassical economics.
For more than a century, the discipline of economics has been dominated by the neoclassical tradition of thought.
Global energy confinement obtained with a configuration optimized according to neoclassical theory, has proved comparable to that of tokamaks running in ELMy Hmode, exhibiting a gyro-Bohm-like property as seen in the International Stellarator Scaling (ISS95).
He perceptively analyzes the remarkably destructive ideas found in neoclassical philosophy that informs current corporate governance theory and practice.
Neoclassical economics accepts as a central truth that humans make strict value assessments about what they'll do and how much they'll pay.
Neoclassical analysis: calculus closer to the real world.
His ballets revived the neoclassical tradition begun in Russia by Lopukhov: classical ballet, complicated, modernized, and enriched by mime (as opposed to having separate mime scenes carry the narrative).
But it all suggests a tension between ecological economics and neoclassical economics.
Ann Cathrin Jarl's premise in Injustice: Women and Global Economics (Fortress, $17) is that feminist critiques of neoclassical economic theories can be strengthened by using liberation feminist ethicists' understandings of justice.
The impact on the economy, investment, and living standard of an aging population can be seen in the neoclassical production function, which states that output is a function of capital and labor inputs and technological changes.