neodymium


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ne·o·dym·i·um

 (nē′ō-dĭm′ē-əm)
n. Symbol Nd
A bright, silvery, reactive element of the lanthanide series, found in the minerals monazite and bastnaesite and used for coloring glass, for doping laser glass and crystals, and in materials with strong, permanent magnetic properties that make them useful for computer and audio equipment. Atomic number 60; atomic weight 144.24; melting point 1,016°C; boiling point 3,074°C; specific gravity 7.008; valence 3. See Periodic Table.

[German Neodym : neo-, neo- + -dym, didymium.]

neodymium

(ˌniːəʊˈdɪmɪəm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a toxic silvery-white metallic element of the lanthanide series, occurring principally in monazite: used in colouring glass. Symbol: Nd; atomic no: 60; atomic wt: 144.24; valency: 3; relative density: 6.80 and 7.00 (depending on allotrope); melting pt: 1024°C; boiling pt: 3127°C
[C19: New Latin; see neo- + didymium]

ne•o•dym•i•um

(ˌni oʊˈdɪm i əm)

n.
a rare-earth metallic trivalent element occurring with cerium and other rare-earth metals, and having rose-colored salts. Symbol: Nd; at. wt.: 144.24; at. no.: 60; sp. gr.: 6.9 at 20°C.
[1880–85; < New Latin; see neo-, didymium]

ne·o·dym·i·um

(nē′ō-dĭm′ē-əm)
Symbol Nd A shiny, silvery metallic element of the lanthanide series that exists in two forms. It is used to make glass for welders' goggles and purple glass for lasers. Atomic number 60. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neodymium - a yellow trivalent metallic element of the rare earth groupneodymium - a yellow trivalent metallic element of the rare earth group; occurs in monazite and bastnasite in association with cerium and lanthanum and praseodymium
metal, metallic element - any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc.
bastnaesite, bastnasite - a yellow-to-brown mineral that is a source of rare earth elements
monazite - a reddish-brown mineral containing rare earth metals; an important source of thorium and cerium
Translations
néodyme

neodymium

[ˌniːəʊˈdɪmɪəm] Nneodimio m

neodymium

n (Chem) → Neodym nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Some modern minerals were not even known to the Romans, neodymium was only discovered in 1885.
The newly developed magnet uses no terbium (Tb) or dysprosium (Dy), which are rare earths that are also categorized as critical materials(3) necessary for highly heat-resistant neodymium magnets.
I use 1/2 x 1/8 neodymium magnets in the four-inch Kurt vise on my milling machine.
Equipped with 30 mm driver with neodymium magnets, Panasonic RP-HF300 headphones deliver crisp and clear sound at home or on the go.
Neodymium is a soft, silvery metal belonging to the class of the so-called rare earth metals.
Machined surfaces can be measured with the removable scale holder that employs Neodymium magnets to keep it positioned firmly against any ferrous material, regardless of surface orientation.
The Temagami Banded Iron Formation, which was formed 2,700 million years ago during the Neoarchean period, can be used as an archive because the isotopic composition of many chemical elements such as Hafnium and Neodymium directly mirrors the composition of Neoarchean seawater.
Neodymium to underpin Ngualla's production value Cerium production from Ngualla represents just 8% of predicted revenue.
As the neodymium rod magnets are contained in stainless steel tubes on which contaminants are collected, when cleaning is needed, the complete magnet assembly is simply removed from the body of the unit and the magnets withdrawn allowing all the collected contamination to be easily removed.
A typical wind turbine will use just under one tonne of neodymium.
Neodymium glass gets its rather ungainly name from the neodymium oxide it contains which is responsible for these dichroic or colour changing properties.
Metals ranging from gold to cobalt and rare earth elements such as neodymium are used in electronic equipment including phones, laptops, headphones, rechargeable batteries and TVs - but are lost when the consumer goods end up in landfill.