neology


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ne·ol·o·gy

 (nē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. ne·ol·o·gies
Neologism.

ne′o·log′i·cal (nē′ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
ne′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.

ne•ol•o•gism

(niˈɒl əˌdʒɪz əm)

n.
1. a new word or phrase or an existing word used in a new sense.
2. the introduction or use of new words or new senses of existing words.
3. a word invented and understood only by the speaker, occurring most often in the speech of schizophrenics.
[1790–1800; < French néologisme]
ne•ol′o•gist, n.
ne•ol`o•gis′tic, adj.
ne•ol′o•gize`, v.i. -gized, -giz•ing.

neologism, neology

1. a new word, usage, or phrase.
2. the coining or introduction of new words or new senses for established words. See also theology. — neologian, neologist, n. — neologistic, neologistical, adj.
See also: Language
1. the introduction of new, especially rationalistic, views or doctrines in theology.
2. such a view or doctrine. Also neologism. See also language. — neologist, n.
See also: Theology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neology - a newly invented word or phrase
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
portmanteau, portmanteau word, blend - a new word formed by joining two others and combining their meanings; "`smog' is a blend of `smoke' and `fog'"; "`motel' is a portmanteau word made by combining `motor' and `hotel'"; "`brunch' is a well-known portmanteau"
2.neology - the act of inventing a word or phrase
invention - the act of inventing
References in periodicals archive ?
(2) For example, Alexander Schmemann, Introduction to Liturgical Theology (Crestwood, N.Y.: St Vladimir's Seminary Press, 1966); Aidan Kavanagh, On Liturgical neology (Collegeville, Minn.: The Liturgical Press, 1984); Kevin W.
Blends have been variously studied for their contribution to neology (Kemmer 2003; Lehrer 2003), for their prosodic structure (Gries 2004, 2012), and their preferred contexts of use, namely literary texts and product names.
Many linguists have studied the role of analogy in English inflectional morphology, says Mattiello, but analogy also deserves attention and investigation in word formation, particularly because of its relevance to neology in English.
Despite occasionally rehearsing anecdotes or references well-known in relation to the topic though doubtless necessary--Hopkins's mention in his journals of "Bleak-faced Neology"--those who are interested in Pater's contribution, if any, to Hopkins's aesthetics will want to read the article.
5 July 2017 - California, US-based Neology, Inc., a subsidiary of Dutch-based RFID manufacturer Smartrac, has closed the acquisition of the tolling and automated license/number plate recognition business of Minnesota, US-based technology company 3M's (NYSE: MMM) traffic safety and security division, the company said.
The material for dictionaries of rare Mari words mainly comes from the Mari neologisms of the 1920s and 1930s, from cultural conferences, writers and poets of the time as well as from writers later on, and from the new neology of the 1990s.
California, US-based Neology, Inc., a subsidiary of Dutch-based RFID manufacturer Smartrac, has agreed to acquire the tolling and automated license/number plate recognition business of Minnesota, US-based technology company 3M's (NYSE: MMM) traffic safety and security division, the company said.
Before joining IBM in 2007, he worked for Neology, a software and technology services division of SmithBucklin.
Coinage is the invention of a non-derivational new term, and is one of the least common ways to introduce new words (Yale, 1996), sometimes called neology. For example, Kasner's son created the word 'googol' when his mathematician father asked him the name of a large number.
Neology: Indicator of the Vitality of a Language and Its Culture
Those circumstances result in a close tight to the French translation and terminology model, and in the French style of Romanian neology.