neology


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ne·ol·o·gy

 (nē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. ne·ol·o·gies
Neologism.

ne′o·log′i·cal (nē′ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
ne′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.

ne•ol•o•gism

(niˈɒl əˌdʒɪz əm)

n.
1. a new word or phrase or an existing word used in a new sense.
2. the introduction or use of new words or new senses of existing words.
3. a word invented and understood only by the speaker, occurring most often in the speech of schizophrenics.
[1790–1800; < French néologisme]
ne•ol′o•gist, n.
ne•ol`o•gis′tic, adj.
ne•ol′o•gize`, v.i. -gized, -giz•ing.

neologism, neology

1. a new word, usage, or phrase.
2. the coining or introduction of new words or new senses for established words. See also theology. — neologian, neologist, n. — neologistic, neologistical, adj.
See also: Language
1. the introduction of new, especially rationalistic, views or doctrines in theology.
2. such a view or doctrine. Also neologism. See also language. — neologist, n.
See also: Theology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neology - a newly invented word or phrase
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
portmanteau, portmanteau word, blend - a new word formed by joining two others and combining their meanings; "`smog' is a blend of `smoke' and `fog'"; "`motel' is a portmanteau word made by combining `motor' and `hotel'"; "`brunch' is a well-known portmanteau"
2.neology - the act of inventing a word or phrase
invention - the act of inventing
References in periodicals archive ?
Many linguists have studied the role of analogy in English inflectional morphology, says Mattiello, but analogy also deserves attention and investigation in word formation, particularly because of its relevance to neology in English.
Approximately 85 employees are expected to join Neology upon completion of the sale.
The material for dictionaries of rare Mari words mainly comes from the Mari neologisms of the 1920s and 1930s, from cultural conferences, writers and poets of the time as well as from writers later on, and from the new neology of the 1990s.
Before joining IBM in 2007, he worked for Neology, a software and technology services division of SmithBucklin.
Coinage is the invention of a non-derivational new term, and is one of the least common ways to introduce new words (Yale, 1996), sometimes called neology.
Those circumstances result in a close tight to the French translation and terminology model, and in the French style of Romanian neology.
Primarily based on the examples from this discourse this article attempts to explore how Roy simultaneously subverts and appropriates English language through the linguistic and textual strategies which include neology transliteration un-translated words glossing code switching and translation equivalents.
Wissbrun, Melt neology and its Role in Plastics Processing, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York (1990).
Professor Emeritus of Systematic Theology, Lutheran School of neology at Chicago
Table 3 Average expenditure growth rates by major discascs categories during years 2000-2010 (in %, not adjusted for inflation) Category 09 02 11 14 Urinary ICD Circulatory neology Digestive and system system reproductive system Growth 9.
Cavanaugh, "From One City to Two: Christian Reimagining of Political Space," Political neology 7, no.