nephron


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nephron
A. renal vein
B. renal artery
C. blood vessels
D. blood
E. Bowman's capsule
F. glomerulus
G. collecting duct
H. urine
I. loop of Henle

neph·ron

 (nĕf′rŏn)
n.
The functional excretory unit of the vertebrate kidney that regulates the amount of water in the body and filters wastes from the blood to produce urine.

[German, from Greek nephros, kidney.]

nephron

(ˈnɛfrɒn)
n
(Anatomy) any of the minute urine-secreting tubules that form the functional unit of the kidneys

neph•ron

(ˈnɛf rɒn)

n.
the filtering and excretory unit of the kidney, consisting of the glomerulus and convoluted tubule.
[< German Nephron]

neph·ron

(nĕf′rŏn)
One of the units of the kidney that filter waste products from the blood and produce urine.

nephron

The basic filtration unit in a kidney. See glomerulus, tubule.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nephron - any of the small tubules that are the excretory units of the vertebrate kidneynephron - any of the small tubules that are the excretory units of the vertebrate kidney
tubule - a small tube
malpighian body, malpighian corpuscle, renal corpuscle - the capsule that contains Bowman's capsule and a glomerulus at the expanded end of a nephron
kidney - either of two bean-shaped excretory organs that filter wastes (especially urea) from the blood and excrete them and water in urine; "urine passes out of the kidney through ureters to the bladder"
Translations
Nephron

neph·ron

n. nefrona, unidad funcional y anatómica del riñón.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the adults of simple vertebrates (fish, amphibians and reptiles) have the ability to regenerate entire nephrons by a process called nephron neogenesis , this capacity is absent in birds and mammals.
With the rapid technological advancement in healthcare industry, and rising incidence of nephron and urological disorders, increasing prevalence of diabetes and hypertension, and aging population.
4,5) However, in surgical resection, the recurrence rate is relatively high (50%) and 25% of cases need reoperation; (6) surgical resection or RFA, however, cannot be applied repetitively due to the nephron loss and possible complications.
Based on preliminary evidence with a spectrum of novel kidney biomarkers, an hypothesis emerged that progression of CKD may, in part, be perpetuated by "active" and ongoing kidney injury that remains undetected until structural losses of nephron mass is reflected in traditional "static" diagnostic markers of kidney function.
They can by their effect on the nephron significantly alter electrolyte balance.
before the alterations in traditional markers), stratify patients on the basis of prognosis, and improve understanding of the nephron segment(s) affected (4).
Doctors said that with the sudden rise in temperature, there has been increase in infection and diseases, and children have been the worst sufferers, said Dr Sanjeev Bagai, chairperson, Nephron Clinic and senior consultant pediatrician.
They may mediate the transfer of information during renal tubule hypertrophy after nephron loss.
GFR calculator (with SI units): Nephron Information Center Website.
The lesions were "focal," affecting some nephrons and sparing others, and "segmented," scarring one part of the nephron.
However, it should be kept in mind that although the glomerular filtration rate returns to normal in most patients, there may be permanent nephron loss which may later result in the development of chronic renal failure.