paralysis

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Related to nerve paralysis: sciatic nerve paralysis

pa·ral·y·sis

 (pə-răl′ĭ-sĭs)
n. pl. pa·ral·y·ses (-sēz′)
1.
a. Loss or impairment of the ability to move a body part, usually as a result of damage to its nerve supply.
b. Loss of sensation over a region of the body.
2. Inability to move or function; total stoppage or severe impairment of activity: fear that led to national paralysis.

[Latin, from Greek paralusis, from paralūein, to disable, loosen : para-, on one side; see para-1 + lūein, to release; see leu- in Indo-European roots.]

paralysis

(pəˈrælɪsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-ˌsiːz)
1. (Pathology) pathol
a. impairment or loss of voluntary muscle function or of sensation (sensory paralysis) in a part or area of the body, usually caused by a lesion or disorder of the muscles or the nerves supplying them
b. a disease characterized by such impairment or loss; palsy
2. cessation or impairment of activity: paralysis of industry by strikes.
[C16: via Latin from Greek paralusis; see para-1, -lysis]

pa•ral•y•sis

(pəˈræl ə sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-ˌsiz)
1.
a. a loss or impairment of movement or sensation in a body part, caused by injury or disease of the nerves, brain, or spinal cord.
b. a disease characterized by this, esp. palsy.
2. a state of helpless stoppage or inability to act.
[1515–25; < Latin < Greek parálysis =paralyein to loosen (i.e., disable) on one side (para- para-1 + lyein to loosen) + -sis -sis; compare palsy]

paralysis

abnormal loss of muscle function or of sensation. — paralytic, n., adj.
See also: Body, Human
loss of the ability to move or feel in part or all of the body, usually a result of nerve or muscle injury or dysfunction. — paralytic, paralytical, adj.
See also: Disease and Illness
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.paralysis - loss of the ability to move a body partparalysis - loss of the ability to move a body part
akinesia, akinesis - motionlessness attributable to a temporary paralysis
alalia - paralysis of the vocal cords resulting in an inability to speak
cystoparalysis, cystoplegia - paralysis of the urinary bladder
diplegia - paralysis of corresponding parts on both sides of the body
Erb-Duchenne paralysis, Erb's palsy - paralysis of the arm resulting from injury to the brachial plexus (usually during childbirth)
monoplegia - paralysis of a single limb
ophthalmoplegia - paralysis of the motor nerves of the eye
disfunction, dysfunction - (medicine) any disturbance in the functioning of an organ or body part or a disturbance in the functioning of a social group; "erectile dysfunction"; "sexual relationship dysfunction"
paresis - a slight or partial paralysis
paraplegia - paralysis of the lower half of the body (most often as a result of trauma)
hemiplegia, unilateral paralysis - paralysis of one side of the body
quadriplegia - paralysis of both arms and both legs

paralysis

noun
1. immobility, palsy, paresis (Pathology) paralysis of the legs
2. standstill, breakdown, stoppage, shutdown, halt, stagnation, inactivity The unions have brought about a total paralysis of trade.
Translations
شَلَل
ochrnutíobrna
lammelse
LähmungPlegie
halvaus
bénulásmegbénulás
lömun
paralysis
paralyžiaus ištiktasparalyžiuotiparalyžius
paralīze
ohromelost
förlamningparalys

paralysis

[pəˈræləsɪs] N (paralyses (pl)) [pəˈræləsiːz] (Med) → parálisis f inv (fig) → paralización f, parálisis f inv

paralysis

[pəˈræləsɪs] [paralyses] [pəˈrælɪsiːz] (pl) n
(MEDICINE)paralysie f
paralysis of the leg → paralysie de la jambe
(= inability to act) → paralysie f

paralysis

n pl <paralyses> → Lähmung f, → Paralyse f; (of industry etc)Lahmlegung f; creeping paralysisprogressive Paralyse

paralysis

[pəˈræləsɪs] n (paralyses (pl)) → paralisi

paralysis

(pəˈrӕləsis) noun
a loss of the ability to move. The paralysis affects his legs.
paralyse , (American) paralyze (ˈpӕrəlaiz) verb
to make unable to move. paralysed with fear.
paralytic (pӕrəˈlitik) adjective

pa·ral·y·sis

n. parálisis, pérdida parcial o total de movimiento o de función de una parte del cuerpo;
accomodation ______ de acomodación;
alcoholic ______ alcohólica;
amyotrofic ______ amiotrófica;
ascending ______ ascendente;
central ______ central;
cold induced ______ por enfriamiento;
diver's ___, pop. bends___ de los buzos;
hysterical ______ histérica;
motor ______ motor;
peripheral fascial ______ periférica facial;
rapidly progressive ______ galopante.

paralysis

n parálisis f; sleep — parálisis del sueño
References in periodicals archive ?
It was confirmed he had radial nerve paralysis in his front leg.
Revised and updated, this edition has expanded discussion of the principles of successful voice therapy, including issues of self-efficacy and patients' responsibilities for their own care; an introduction to the concept of meta-therapy; cases detailing new evidence-based therapies like conversation training therapy and Lax Vox therapy; new cases describing treatment for chronic cough, superior nerve paralysis, and vocal tremor in a singer; and a new chapter of cases on a nontraditional therapy delivery model, telepractice, treatments for enhancing the transgender voice, pervasive vocal fry, and muscle tension dysphagia.
She was conscious and cooperating, and the results of her system examination were normal, except for the right abducens nerve paralysis. In fundoscopic examination, she was found to have papillary edema.
While there was no apparent facial nerve paralysis, electroneurography (ENoG) revealed lower amplitude on the right side (45%), suggesting hidden facial nerve disturbance (Figure 3).
Causes of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Arch Otolaryngol 1976; 102: 259-61.
In spite of this, there are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, in approximately 40-75% of cases, the cause of unilateral FP is still unknown and it remains idiopathic (2).
We may think that the facial nerve paralysis may occur after the scalp block because of the close proximity of the facial nerve and the auriculotemporal nerve, as described by Pinosky et al.
* Numbness, pain, nerve paralysis (often of the facial muscles, usually on one side), and meningitis (fever, stiff neck, and severe headache)
Facial nerve paralysis in children might have variable etiologies apart from idiopathic Bell's palsy.
However, the major disadvantage of the interscalene block is the risk of ipsilateral phrenic nerve paralysis, with an incidence as high as 100% [2], depending on the volume, concentration, and location of local anesthetic administered.
Yalnizoglu, "Acute abducens nerve paralysis in the Pediatric Emergency Department: Analysis of 14 patients," Pediatric Emergency Care, vol.