nerviness


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Related to nerviness: nervousness

nerv·y

 (nûr′vē)
adj. nerv·i·er, nerv·i·est
1. Arrogantly impudent; brazen.
2. Showing or requiring courage and fortitude; bold.
3. Chiefly British Jumpy; nervous.
4. Archaic Full of muscular force; sinewy.

nerv′i·ness n.
Translations
جَسارَه، عَصَبِيَّه
rozčilenost
opfarenhed
taugaspenna
asabilik

nerviness

[ˈnɜːvɪnɪs] Nnerviosidad f, nerviosismo m

nerve

(nəːv) noun
1. one of the cords which carry messages between all parts of the body and the brain.
2. courage. He must have needed a lot of nerve to do that; He lost his nerve.
3. rudeness. What a nerve!
verb
to force (oneself) to have enough courage (to do something). He nerved himself to climb the high tower.
nerves noun plural
the condition of being too easily excited or upset. She suffers from nerves.
ˈnervous adjective
1. of the nerves. the nervous system.
2. rather afraid. She was nervous about travelling by air; a nervous old lady.
ˈnervously adverb
ˈnervousness noun
ˈnervy adjective
excitable. The horse is rather nervy.
ˈnerviness noun
ˈnerve-racking adjective
causing great anxiety or nervousness. a nerve-racking experience.
nervous breakdown
a period of mental illness caused by a time of great strain.
nervous system
the brain, spinal cord and nerves of a person or animal.
get on someone's nerves
to irritate someone. Her behaviour really gets on my nerves.
References in periodicals archive ?
Asked about his unusual bout of nerviness, Federer said: "It was definitely more acute than I normally feel.
Edmund Asked about his unusual bout of nerviness, Federer said: "It was definitely more acute than I normally feel.
What is most startling about this garden is its relative (compared with Sissinghurst and Nymans) wildness, the daring originality with which wildflowers have been encouraged to grow alongside delicate specimens, the nerviness with which cultivated areas and meticulous topiary (curved yew hedges and plantings in the shape of animals) alternate with fields that have been left unmown.
These two goals were the direct result of nerviness on the part of Queen of the South defence.