debility

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de·bil·i·ty

 (dĭ-bĭl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. de·bil·i·ties
The state of being weak or feeble; infirmity.

[Middle English debilite, from Old French, from Latin dēbilitās, from dēbilis, weak; see bel- in Indo-European roots.]

debility

(dɪˈbɪlɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
weakness or infirmity

de•bil•i•ty

(dɪˈbɪl ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. a weakened or enfeebled state; weakness.
2. a handicap or disability.
[1425–75; late Middle English debylite < Middle French debilite < Latin dēbilitās=dēbil(is) weak + -itās -ity]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.debility - the state of being weak in health or body (especially from old age)
unfitness, softness - poor physical condition; being out of shape or out of condition (as from a life of ease and luxury)
asthenia, astheny - an abnormal loss of strength
cachexia, cachexy, wasting - any general reduction in vitality and strength of body and mind resulting from a debilitating chronic disease

debility

noun weakness, exhaustion, frailty, incapacity, infirmity, feebleness, faintness, decrepitude, enervation, enfeeblement, sickliness Anxiety or general debility can play a part in allergies.

debility

noun
Translations
وَهْن، ضَعْف
ochablostslabostvyčerpanost
svækkelsesvaghed
veiklun
takatsizlikzayıflık

debility

[dɪˈbɪlɪtɪ] Ndebilidad f

debility

[dɪˈbɪlɪti] n [patient] (= infirmity) → extrême faiblesse f

debility

nSchwäche f

debility

[dɪˈbɪlɪtɪ] n (frm) → debilitazione f

debilitate

(diˈbiliteit) verb
to make weak.
deˈbility noun
bodily weakness. Despite his debility, he leads a normal life.

de·bil·i·ty

n. debilidad; atonía.
References in periodicals archive ?
The rising number of days people are taking off due to stress, anxiety, mental health and nervous debility is being blamed on the recession.
A Miss Irene Smith wrote that "Peruna has cured me of catarrh of the head and stomach, and nervous debility .
For example, the retired gentleman cured of deafness, blindness, nervous debility and indigestion (you would not imagine that the last of these troubled him unduly) could only be contacted through correspondence.