neurasthenia

(redirected from neurasthenics)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to neurasthenics: Americanitis

neu·ras·the·ni·a

 (no͝or′əs-thē′nē-ə, nyo͝or′-)
n.
A group of symptoms, including chronic physical and mental fatigue, weakness, and generalized aches and pains, formerly thought to result from exhaustion of the nervous system and now usually considered a psychological disorder. The term is no longer in clinical use in many parts of the world.

neu′ras·then′ic (-thĕn′ĭk) adj. & n.
neu′ras·then′i·cal·ly adv.

neurasthenia

(ˌnjʊərəsˈθiːnɪə)
n
(Psychiatry) an obsolete technical term for a neurosis characterized by extreme lassitude and inability to cope with any but the most trivial tasks
neurasthenic adj, n
neurastheniac n
ˌneurasˈthenically adv

neur•as•the•ni•a

(ˌnʊər əsˈθi ni ə, ˌnyʊər-)

n.
1. a pattern of symptoms including chronic fatigue, sleep disturbances, and persistent aches, often linked with depression.
2. prostration due to extreme emotional distress or dejection.
[1855–60]
neur`as•then′ic (-ˈθɛn ɪk) adj., n.
neur`as•then′i•cal•ly, adv.

neurasthenia

- A disorder characterized by loss of energy, lack of motivation, and feelings of inadequacy, along with vague physical symptoms such as headache or muscle pain.
See also related terms for headache.

neurasthenia

1. Medicine. a nervous debility and exhaustion, as from overwork or prolonged nervous strain.
2. popularly, a nervous breakdown, — neurasthenie, adj.
See also: Nerves
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neurasthenia - nervous breakdown (not in technical use)
nervous breakdown - a severe or incapacitating emotional disorder
Translations

neurasthenia

[ˌnjʊərəsˈθiːnɪə] Nneurastenia f

neurasthenia

neur·as·the·ni·a

n. neurastenia, término asociado con un estado general de irritabilidad y agotamiento nervioso;
angiopathic ______ angiopática;
gravis ______ grave;
praecox ______ precoz;
primary ______ primaria;
pulsating ______ pulsativa.
References in classic literature ?
She was living in the country town where he had had his last appointment, and there she was supporting the family: her daughter, her ailing neurasthenic son-in-law, and her five grandchildren.
Discouraged by lack of appreciation, always abnormally high-strung and neurasthenic, he gradually lapsed into insanity, and died at the age of thirty-seven.
Inspired by sensational press accounts of violent accidents and early film "actualities," McCay's city dwellers are embattled neurasthenics.
All in all, "neurasthenia may lead to suicide; the neurasthenics being, in fact, by their temperament, seemingly destined to suffer.