schwannoma

(redirected from neurilemmoma)
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Related to neurilemmoma: neurofibroma, schwannoma
Translations

schwannoma

n schwannoma m; vestibular — schwannoma vestibular
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References in periodicals archive ?
INTRODUCTION: Schwannoma or neurilemmoma are benign, slow growing, usually solitary and encapsulated tumor, originating from Schwann cells of the peripheral, autonomic and cranial nerves.
Intraparotid neurilemmoma. Acta Otolaryngol 1983;95:382-4.
The term "ancient neurilemmoma" was first suggested by Ackerman and Taylor [4].
The painful tumor differential diagnosis has been described in the literature by the mnemonic "LEND AN EGG": leiomyoma, eccrine spiradenoma, neuroma, dermatofibroma, angiolipoma, neurilemmoma, endometrioma, glomus tumor, and granular cell tumor.
Differential diagnosis includes keloid scar, mucocele, salivary gland tumor (most likely canalicular adenoma of a small salivary gland within the lip), lipoma, neurilemmoma and neurofibroma (clinically reminiscent of angiomyoma, but immunohistochemically different), and possibly granular cell tumor.
Schwannoma was first described by Verocay in 1908 and named as "neuroma," later in 1935 Stout suggested the name "neurilemmoma" because the tumor arises from nerve sheath and schwann cells (1).
Chiu, "Role of sonography in the preoperative assessment of neurilemmoma," Journal of Clinical Ultrasound, vol.
Neurilemmoma also known as schwannoma is a benign tumor of nerve sheath origin, arising from any nerve covered with a schwann cell sheath, which includes the cranial nerves (except for optic and olfactory), the spinal nerves, and autonomic nervous system [1, 2].
Schwannoma, also known as neurilemmoma, is a benign tumor of Schwann cells in the neural sheath of myelinated nerves throughout the body [1].
Peripheral nerve tumors that may manifest in oral cavity includes several differentials such as schwannoma (also known as neurilemmoma or peripheral nerve sheath tumor), neurofibroma, neurinoma in association with multiple endocrine neoplasia, palisaded encapsulated neurinoma, traumatic neuroma and granular cell tumor.2,5 Immunohistochemical reactivity against S-100 and neuron-specific enolase is an essential tool to differentiate these tumors from spindle cell neoplasms of other origin (myofibroblastic tumors, tumors of muscle tissue origin, and fibroblastic tumors).