neuroblastoma

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neu·ro·blas·to·ma

 (no͝or′ō-blă-stō′mə, nyo͝or′-)
n. pl. neu·ro·blas·to·mas or neu·ro·blas·to·ma·ta (-mə-tə)
A malignant tumor composed of neuroblasts, originating in the autonomic nervous system or the adrenal medulla and occurring chiefly in infants and young children.

neuroblastoma

(ˌnjʊərəʊblæsˈtəʊmə)
n, pl -mata (-matə) or -mas
(Pathology) pathol a malignant tumour that derives from neuroblasts, occurring mainly in the adrenal gland

neu•ro•blas•to•ma

(ˌnʊər oʊ blæˈstoʊ mə, ˌnyʊər-)

n., pl. -mas, -ma•ta (-mə tə)
a malignant tumor of immature nerve cells, most often affecting the young.
[1905–10]

neuroblastoma

a highly malignant tumor that may develop from the neural plate in an embryo and spread to the bones, liver, and other organs.
See also: Cancer
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neuroblastoma - malignant tumor containing embryonic nerve cells; usually metastasizes quickly
malignant neoplasm, malignant tumor, metastatic tumor - a tumor that is malignant and tends to spread to other parts of the body
Translations
neuroblastooma
neuroblastoma

neuroblastoma

n neuroblastoma m
References in periodicals archive ?
We conducted a retrospective study to review our experience with minimally invasive resection of olfactory neuroblastomas via a transnasal endoscopic technique, including an analysis of surgical outcomes.
Relapsed neuroblastomas show frequent RAS-MAPK pathway mutations," Nature Genetics, published online June 29, 2015.
The high-risk group comprises all MYCN-amplified neuroblastomas, regardless of stage and age of the child, plus non-MYCN-amplified stage 4 neuroblastomas for children older than 18 months.
Most neuroblastomas begin in the abdomen in the adrenal gland or next to the spinal cord or in the chest.
6 Most (70 - 90%) neuroblastomas usually occur in the first 5 years of life.
7] More than 90% of prenatally diagnosed neuroblastomas are adrenal in origin.
Boffins were able to successfully analyse the DNA of tumour cells and identify chromosomal defects with the use of latest genetic techniques, enabling the identification of sub-groups of the most aggressive neuroblastomas.
Most neuroblastomas produce catecholamines, which result in some of the most interesting presentations observed in children with neuroblastoma.
Team leader Dr Carmel McConville, of the Division of Medical and Molecular Genetics at Birmingham University, said: 'The key to treating neuroblastomas successfully is to work out how they are likely to respond to treatment, and to adjust drug and radiotherapy regimes accordingly.
They hope to identify new ways to disrupt this pathway so neuroblastomas can be more effectively treated.
Another major focus of his research has concerned receptor tyrosine kinases, a family of signaling proteins that control the clinical behavior of neuroblastomas.
In the study, NT-3 was found to be expressed at increased levels in aggressive human neuroblastomas and to block the ability of TrkC to induce tumour cell death by a process known as apoptosis.