neurochemical


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neu·ro·chem·is·try

 (no͝or′ō-kĕm′ĭ-strē, nyo͝or′-)
n.
The study of the chemical composition and processes of the nervous system and the effects of chemicals on it.

neu′ro·chem′i·cal (-kəl) adj.
neu′ro·chem′ist n.

neurochemical

(ˌnjʊərəʊˈkɛmɪkəl) biochem
n
(Biochemistry) a neuroactive substance
adj
(Biochemistry) of or pertaining to neurochemistry

neu•ro•chem•i•cal

(ˌnʊər oʊˈkɛm ɪ kəl, ˌnyʊər-)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to neurochemistry.
n.
2. a substance that affects the nervous system.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neurochemical - any organic substance that occurs in neural activity
organic compound - any compound of carbon and another element or a radical
neurotransmitter - a neurochemical that transmits nerve impulses across a synapse
endorphin - a neurochemical occurring naturally in the brain and having analgesic properties
References in periodicals archive ?
Substance addicts create "neurochemical numbness" by using various chemicals.
When you sit down with a book and a child (having turned off your technology), you unleash a tsunami of neurochemical benefits.
These disturbances may explain certain morphological and neurochemical characteristics in the brains of patients with schizophrenia.
Brain activity was assessed by examining changes on neurochemical levels induced by the company's lead candidate xB3-001 vs.
Initially this is a good thing, because it is the activation of this system that releases the neurochemical adrenaline - and this stimulates you to get going and focus on your work.
Being on the receiving end of constant anger, stress or other negativity triggers toxic neurochemical reactions in the body.
Lucemyra suppresses the neurochemical surge that produces the acute and painful symptoms of opioid withdrawal.
The company said LUCEMYRA (lofexidine) suppresses the neurochemical surge that produces the painful opioid withdrawal symptoms, aches/pains, muscle spasms/twitching, stomach cramps, muscular tension, heart pounding, insomnia/problems sleeping, feelings of coldness, runny eyes, yawning and feeling sick.
The drugs that induce behavioural and neurochemical changes are impossible to quit.
Recent studies, however, suggest that PTSD has organic, cellular, and molecular responses, and can be described by measuring neuroendocrine, neurochemical, and neuroanatomic parameters (Sherin & Nemeroff, 2011).
Barr maintains that understanding how these factors affect behavior beyond just a neurochemical level makes more effective medical practitioners.