neurogenesis


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neu·ro·gen·e·sis

 (no͝or′ə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs, nyo͝or′-)
n. pl. neu·ro·gen·e·ses (-sēz′)
Formation of nervous tissue.

neurogenesis

(ˌnjʊərəʊˈdʒɛnəsɪs)
n
(Physiology) embryol the formation of the nervous system in embryos
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neurogenesis - the development of nerve tissues
growing, growth, ontogenesis, ontogeny, maturation, development - (biology) the process of an individual organism growing organically; a purely biological unfolding of events involved in an organism changing gradually from a simple to a more complex level; "he proposed an indicator of osseous development in children"
References in periodicals archive ?
Neurogenesis in the adult brain is a normal process to generate new neurons and occurs throughout life in restricted brain regions, which is called neurogenic regions, such as the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle in mammals.
The studies of Queensland University of Technology (QUT) researchers in adult mice show that two weeks of daily treatment with the drug tandospirone reversed the effects of 15 weeks of binge-like alcohol consumption on neurogenesis - the ability of the brain to grow and replace neurons (brain cells).
Researchers have linked several activities that can help maintain or increase neurogenesis in older age.
It has the same elasticity as cerebral tissue and has special adhesive molecules that promote neuronal fate and neurogenesis, creating the ideal conditions for neurogenesis.
The finding could have implications for understanding and treating many brain disorders arising from aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis, including epilepsy, schizophrenia, depression, and Alzheimer's disease.
Neurogenesis involves proteins called neurotrophins--or brain growth factors--which are secreted by surrounding cells to help neurons adapt, survive and make new connections.
Learning and Memory: A Comprehensive Reference, Second Edition is updated to provide an authoritative reference on all facets of learning and memory and expands coverage of sleep and memory, neuromodulators in memory processing, neurogenesis, epigenetics and working memory.
This discovery prompted Brant Cortright, PhD, professor of psychology at San Francisco's California Institute of Integral Studies, to look at the research and write a book about this exciting new field of neurogenesis.
Depression is common in patients with cancer and it has been suggested that its prevalence could be related to the effect of chemotherapy in stopping the generation of new neurons in the brain, known as neurogenesis, reported BBC health.
All of that activity triggers neurogenesis (creation of new nerve cells) in the hippocampus, one of the parts of your brain responsible for locomotion, but is also in charge of memory and stress management.
Adult neurogenesis occurring in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is a dynamic process regulated by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors (Aimone et al.
It begins with chapters on the order of ontogeny, including cell differentiation and neural induction, the development of a body pattern, neurogenesis and neural migration, neural differentiation, axonal pathfinding, synapse formation, and apoptosis, followed by chapters on activity-guided, experience-guided, and socially guided neural development.